Department of Animation and Production

ANI 101Introduction to Animation: Theories and Techniques I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces students to the principles of animation through classical animation techniques. Students explore the art of creating convincing movement through effective timing, spacing, and drawing. Works of master animators are screened and analyzed frame-by-frame to illustrate the principles covered in class, and students will put their knowledge to work through a series of exercises. The ultimate goal of both this course and its sequel is to introduce methods by which animators act and bring characters to life through sequential images.

ANI 125Acting for Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

An animator’s ability to express attitude, thought, and emotion through a character’s body language is a fundamental skill necessary for success. Therefore, this course focuses on presenting tools and techniques for translating thoughts and feelings into specific gestures and actions. The course introduces students to the history of acting in theater, animation, and film. Students explore the basic fundamentals and differences of acting for the stage, film, and animation through a series of acting exercises and problems. Special emphasis is given to classical method acting.

ANI 151Advanced Animation: Theories and Techniques II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 101

In this course students continue to explore and exercise the concepts and techniques of classical animation through a series of assignments. The exercises in this course are considerably more demanding than those completed in ANI 101 as they are longer and will require more refinement, subtlety, and creativity. There is also a greater emphasis on character development - the expression of personality, mood, thought, and attitude through motion and posing.

ANI 300Acting Through an Interface (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 125, ANI 151, CG 275

An animator’s ability to express attitude, thought, and emotion through a surrogate is a fundamental skill of 3D character animation. This course builds upon the earlier acting and 2D animation curriculum. It explores 3D character animation techniques of performance, physicality, and weight. Students complete a number of animation assignments during the semester.

ANI 301Physicality and Pantomime in CG Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 125, ANI 151, ART 201, ART 226, CG 275

Students in this course will be expected to take the information and experience they have learned in ANI 101 and ANI 151 and develop those principles further. Here students will create a catalog of movement and dynamic expression. They will explore a full range of action in depth and dimension, paying special attention to gestured movement and timed performance. They will learn that the pose is everything and that the movement from pose to pose in three-dimensional space can help heighten and dramatize performance. In this course students will not only deepen their understanding of performance animation but also a mastery of performance in time and space.

ANI 350Voice Acting for Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 300

This course explores the nature of acting through the medium of the human voice. The curriculum explores narration, expressive reading, diction, and vocal refinement. It introduces students to basic audio technology and recording equipment. The course also covers lip-synchronization techniques in animation and culminates in a series of practical exercises in both 2D and 3D animation.

ANI 399Special Topics in Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it’s offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ANI 400Cinematic Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 275 or MUS 115, ANI 350, ART 401

This course is a culmination of the student’s ability to use animation as a storytelling medium. It also provides an opportunity for the student to demonstrate his or her personal artistic growth. Each student works to complete a short piece of cinematic animation. Working independently or in small groups with the instructor’s approval, students may use either 2D or 3D tools.

ANI 450Advanced Animation Portfolio (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 350, CG 300, PRJ 350

This course requires students to further extend their portfolio work, principally polishing and refining elements that will align them well for current industry needs. With a generous selection of assignment opportunities to be explored, students will gain advanced instruction on more focused acting, physicality and creature animation. This course will provide students with an ideal opportunity to improve an area of their portfolio work that will better represent animated body mechanics and acting skills.

FLM 115History of Film and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course examines the more than 100-year history of film and animation. Beginning with the scientific and technical advances that made these media technologies possible, students explore every major movement and genre as well as their impact on society. The course gives students critical vocabulary required for explaining story, animation, and cinematic techniques.

FLM 151Visual Language and Film Analysis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Animation is ultimately filmmaking, and animators should learn from the many classics on how to effectively bring various film production elements together. Students review several films and study how the relationships between scripts, cameras, lighting, sets, production design, sound, acting, costumes, props, directing, and production lead to successful visual stories. They also examine the fundamental theories underlying visual storytelling. Understanding the creative processes utilized by these influential filmmakers provides insight into how students may improve their own animations.

FLM 201Cinematography (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 151

Credit may be received for either FLM 201 or FLM 210, but not for both.

Like a filmmaker, computer animators must have a good understanding of appropriate camera composition, lighting, and editing techniques to enhance the visual impact of the story being told. Appropriate composition and camera movement help to reveal action, and lighting establishes focus, place, and mood. Assignments in camera composition, movement, lighting, and editing help students solidify their understanding of the concepts presented.

FLM 210Cinematography for Visual Effects (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 151

Credit may be received for either FLM 201 or FLM 210, but not for both.

This course focuses on the technical aspects of cinematography including understanding how cameras work, how images are captured and processed, computer graphics theory, and image analysis. Emphasis is on digital imagery.

FLM 215Visual Effects Analysis and Process (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 151

This course explores the history of visual effects in film and how the craft has developed in terms of technology and processes. Students also examine the fundamental production pipeline for the planning and execution of visual effects.

FLM 250Digital Post-Production (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 151

The last step of any animation project involves the assembly of various production elements ranging from rendered files to sound effects. This is also the stage where the visual effects artists add the effects seen in today’s movies. This course teaches the fundamental skills these artists use in post-production. Effective editing skills are the primary outcome of the course. Students will also cover the planning, execution, and addition of special effects to animation.

FLM 350Compositing I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 201, FLM 210, FLM 215

This course introduces students to two key areas of compositing -- image preparation (e.g., rotoscoping, blue/green screen, masks, wire removal) and compositing software (layer-based, node-based). Students apply this knowledge to basic 2D compositing, as well as motion tracking and color correction.

FLM 360Compositing II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275, FLM 350

This advanced compositing course focuses on the integration of 3D elements into live action footage. Concepts covered include image stabilization, lighting, green screen setup and shooting, match moving, camera tracking, and body tracking.

FLM 399Special Topics in Film (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

FLM 508 Cinematography and the Art of the Story (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course explores how stories are told in films and the cinematic elements of games to give visual artists insight and practical experience into visualizing stories. It explores not only the basic elements of drama, and pushes further into the unique language of visual storytelling. It may cover the theories of editing, sound, the basic principles of lighting, and the management of the visualization elements.

INT 390Internship I (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required.

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

INT 450Internship II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required.

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

PRJ 2012D Animation Production (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, ART 125

This is a traditional animation course within the context of a two-semester project. This project builds on the cumulative skill sets acquired in ANI 101 and ANI 151, but with a focus on team dynamics, acting, visual storytelling, and the goal of completing a short animated film rather than a series of learning exercises. This course concentrates on pre-production for the project.

PRJ 2512D Animation Production (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 201

This is a traditional animation course within the context of a two-semester project. This project builds on the cumulative skill sets acquired in ANI 101 and ANI 151, but with a focus on team dynamics, acting, visual storytelling, and the goal of completing a short animated film rather than a series of learning exercises. Building on the work completed in PRJ 201, PRJ 251 concentrates on the production and animation for the project.

PRJ 300Limited-Scope 3D Production (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 251, ART 300, ART 350, CG 275, PRJ 251

In PRJ 300 students will be guided through the elements of creating a short animated piece from design through pre-production including designing and building a character as well as an environment, then planning the animation. The remainder of the production continues in PRJ350.

PRJ 3503D Animation Production (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 300, CG 300, PRJ 300

PRJ 350 picks up where PRJ 300 left off in further developing design and production skills. The course is a full-semester project where students will produce a short animated production that demonstrates their skills in design, modeling, animation, lighting and rendering.

PRJ 400Senior Cinematic Project I (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 350, ENG 116, PRJ 350

This course is the first half of a two semester sequence on the production of an innovative short film. It focuses on concept, pre-production and asset creation in a team environment. Teams include other BFA students registered in PRJ 400. Projects can be produced in 2D or 3D. Additional topics may include effective presentations, managing scope, and team dynamics.

PRJ 402Senior Game Art Project I (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 310 or CG 350, ART 350, ENG 116, PRJ 350

This course is the first half of a two semester sequence on the production of an innovative interactive experience. It focuses on concept, pre-production and asset creation in a team environment. Students may use current software and hardware technologies such as web technologies, consoles, mobile devices. Teams include other BFA students registered in PRJ 402 and will collaborate with students registered for GAM classes. Projects can be produced in 2D or 3D. Additional topics may include effective presentations, managing scope and team dynamics.

PRJ 450Senior Cinematic Project II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 400

With the completed pre-production work for a cinematic project done, students are then guided through final rendering and post-production. Students are assisted through the challenges of commercial art direction, quality control, production deadlines, and team dynamics, as well as many technical challenges.

PRJ 452Senior Game Art Project II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 402

Having completed the pre-production work for a team-based interactive experience production in PRJ 402, students are guided through final implementation, debugging and polish of their projects. Students face the challenges of commercial art direction, quality control, production deadlines, and team dynamics, as well as the many technical challenges. Teams include other BFA students registered in PRJ 452 and will collaborate with students registered for GAM classes.

PRJ 690Thesis I: Proposal Pre-Production (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Students research, develop and refine an original idea for their thesis topic. Additionally, they create an outline of their production plan including timeline and milestones. At the end of the course, they present their work at the mid-point thesis review. Approval by the thesis committee is a requirement for passing this course.

PRJ 701Thesis II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 690

Students begin work on a thesis project under the guidance of their thesis advisor.

PRJ 702Thesis III (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 701

Students continue work on a thesis project under the guidance of their thesis advisor.

Department of Computer Science

CS 100Computer Environment (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): CS 100L

This course provides students with a detailed examination of the fundamental elements on which computers are based. Topics covered include number systems, representation of numbers in computation, basic electricity, electric circuits, digital systems, logic circuits, data representations, digital memory, computer architecture, and operating systems. Operational code and assembly languages are discussed, examined, and used in either a microprocessor or microcontroller environment, such as a personal computer or an autonomous car.

CS 100LComputer Environment Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): CS 100

CS 100L is the lab component of the introductory computer environment course. Students meet weekly to explore the topics presented in CS 100, from building basic analog and digital circuits to programming a microcontroller to manage autonomous robot navigation.

CS 115Introduction to Scripting and Programming (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for CS 115 or for CS 120, but not for both.

This course introduces programming environments to students who are not experienced programmers. This course covers simple logic, programming flow, and the use of variables. It introduces students to the history of programming and the basic vocabulary of the programming industry. The course culminates in a series of hands-on exercises using this knowledge to solve problems. At his or her discretion, the instructor may cover special topics in programming or scripting.

CS 116Introduction to Computer Technology and Programming (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces programming environments to students who are not enrolled in a science degree program at DigiPen. The course provides students with an introductory overview of the fundamental elements on which computers are based, including basic computer hardware systems, operations, and structures. An introduction to basic programming includes simple logic, programming flow, loops, variables, and arrays. Conditionals, evaluations, and other control structures are also included. The instructor may cover special topics in programming or scripting and may focus on currently popular scripting languages in the video game industry.

CS 120High-Level Programming I: The C Programming Language (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): CS 120L

In presenting the C programming language, this course serves as a foundation for all high level programming courses and projects. It provides the fundamentals of programming, including control flows, such as statement grouping, decision-making, case selection, procedure iteration, and termination test and basic data types, such as arrays, structures, and pointers. Additionally, it intensively discusses the lexical convention, syntax notation, and semantics.

CS 120LHigh-Level Programming I Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): CS 120

This is the lab component of the introductory High-Level Programming I course. Students meet for two hours weekly to apply the concepts presented in CS 120 in a controlled environment.

CS 170High-Level Programming II: The C++ Programming Language (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120, CS 120L

Concurrent Course(s): CS 170L

This course is a continuation of High-Level Programming I (CS 120). It introduces the C++ language with particular emphasis on its object-oriented features. Topics covered include stylistic and usage differences between C and C++, namespaces, function and operator overloading, classes, inheritance, class and function templates, STL lists, and vectors.

CS 170LHigh-Level Programming II Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120, CS 120L

Concurrent Course(s): CS 170

This is the lab component of the High-Level Programming II course. Students meet weekly to work on topics presented in the CS 170 lectures in a lab environment.

CS 175Scripting Languages (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 116 or CS 120

This course covers the concepts and implementation strategies for using high-level scripting languages in game development. Students will focus on object-oriented programming, high-level English-like structure, speed of development, and ease of use. The course includes a survey of commercial languages, as well as proprietary scripting languages from industry applications. Students will examine the process of conceptualizing a syntax for a game-based scripting language and examine how such a language is compiled and interpreted by a game engine. Using the syntax they have created, they will create a number of scripts that could be used in a game. Additionally, the course will cover such relevant topics as data-driven technology, modular coding, function calls, and procedures.

CS 176Advanced Scripting (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170 or CS 175

This course presents game implementation techniques and game architecture in a scripting language environment. Students investigate concepts of game architecture, such as game-system component separation and game flow while learning about essential elements such as the game state manager, input/output handler, and frame rate controller. Students learn how to create several different types of classic games in a variety of scripting languages most commonly used for professional games, learning the specific syntax and approaches of each language in the process. As part of their implementation, students learn how to use the specific graphics, audio interface, physics and math APIs found in the scripting environments used. Students survey concepts in space partitioning, particle systems, map editors and other elements so that they are capable of creating working prototypes of 2D games.

CS 180Operating Systems I: Man-Machine Interface (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 100 or CS 101, CS 100L or CS 101, CS 170, CS 170L

This course presents an overview of modern operating systems, in particular Windows and Linux/Unix as implemented on modern PCs. After an overview of what an operating system is and does, the following is also covered: organization and design (the kernel and various subsystems), process management (creation and management of processes and threads, including an introduction to multi-threaded programming), networks (the TCP/IP stack and the organization of the Internet), interprocess communication, process synchronization (locks, semaphores, and methods to avoid deadlocks), memory management (hardware and process views of memory layout and demand-paged virtual memory), file systems, and security and protection (viruses, worms, and Trojan horses).

CS 200Computer Graphics I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L, MAT 140

This course presents fundamental mathematical elements, data structures, and algorithms useful for animating and viewing 2D primitives. The course aims to fulfill two objectives. The first objective is to provide students with a sufficient mathematical and algorithmic background to design and implement 2D graphics applications. The second objective is to prepare students with the knowledge required for writing 3D graphics applications. The first half of the course deals with scan-conversion algorithms for rasterizing 2D primitives such as lines, circles, ellipses, triangles, and arbitrary polygons. The second half of the course is concerned with the viewing and animation of these 2D primitives. The course covers topics such as interpolation techniques, transformations, culling, clipping, animation techniques, and the 2D viewing pipeline.

CS 211Introduction to Databases (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L

This course provides a broad overview of database systems. It presents the fundamentals, practices, and applications of computer databases. Topics include database architectures, data modeling, design schemes, transaction processing, and database implementation.

CS 212Advanced Databases (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 211

This course will cover advanced database topics with particular emphasis on the large-scale database systems used by modern applications. Data mining and data warehousing will be explored with emphasis on search and analysis. Non-relational databases will also be covered in detail.

CS 225Advanced C/C++ (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L

This course builds on the foundation created in the first two high-level programming courses (CS 120 and CS 170). It presents advanced topics of the C/C++ programming language in greater detail. Such topics include advanced pointer manipulation, utilizing multi-dimensional arrays, complex declarations, and standard library functions. Advanced C++ topics include class and function templates, operator overloading, multiple inheritance, runtime type information, the standard template library, and performance issues.

CS 230Game Implementation Techniques (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120, CS 120L

Concurrent Course(s): CS 170, CS 170L

This presents game implementation techniques and engine architecture. Students investigate foundational concepts of game architecture, such as game-system component separation and game flow, while learning about essential elements such as the game state manager, input/output handler, and frame rate controller. This course introduces Windows programming, state machines, and collision detection algorithms, which students will integrate into their own remakes of classic games. As part of their implementation, students create and expand their own collision, vector, and matrix libraries, enabling them to incorporate basic physics engines. Students survey concepts in space partitioning, particle systems, map editors, and other elements as a bridge to more advanced concepts in implementation techniques and engine architecture.

CS 241Fundamental Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Entrance into the Master of Science in Computer Science program.

This course covers the contents of CS 200 and CS 250 in a single semester. It examines the algorithms and mathematical elements needed to generate and render 2D and 3D scenes. Topics include the graphics pipeline, 2D and 3D coordinate systems and their transformations, homogeneous coordinates and perspective calculations, scan-conversion algorithms, color models, collision detection techniques, and basic culling, clipping, and intersection.

CS 245Introduction to Interactive Sound Synthesis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 100 or MAT 140, CS 170, CS 180, PHY 200

This course explores dynamic sound synthesis, 3D-directional auditory effects, and sonic ambience to real-time simulations and video games. The subjects include mixing audio and modulating dry recorded sounds using wave table synthesis. Students learn how to create collision sounds using additive synthesis, wind effects using subtractive synthesis, natural sounds using granular synthesis and physical modeling, ambiences using layering and spectral filtering, 3D spatialized surround sound panning, inter-aural time difference, inter-aural intensity difference, and Head Related Transforms (HRTFS). Students also study algorithms and techniques for real-time multi-threaded programming and synthesized sound integration for game engines.

CS 246Advanced Sound Synthesis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 245

This course covers the basic building blocks that go into making a sound engine. Topics may include: audio file formats, sound card architecture, low level sound APIs, high level sound APIs, streaming audio, mixing, digital filters and effects, 3D audio, audio spectra and the Fast Fourier Transform.

CS 250Computer Graphics II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 200

This course examines the mathematical elements and algorithms used in the design and development of real-time 3D computer graphics applications, such as games, cockpit simulators, and architectural walk-throughs. 3D computer graphics involve drawing pictures of 3D objects, usually on a 2D screen. This process of generating a 2D image of a 3D graphics application can be described as a series of distinct operations performed on a set of input data. Each operation generates results for the successive one. This process is called the graphics rendering pipeline, and it is the core of real-time computer graphics. The graphics pipeline can be conceptualized as consisting of three stages: application, transformation, and rasterization. The course begins by introducing the 3D graphics pipeline. The application stage is examined from the viewpoint of the representation, modeling, and animation of 3D objects. Topics include user interaction, camera animation techniques, simulation of dynamic objects, and collision detection techniques. Next, the course examines the process of mapping 3D graphic objects from model-space to viewport coordinates. The transformation stage implements this process. Finally, the conversion of a geometric primitive in viewport coordinates into a 2D image is studied. The rasterization stage implements this final process.

CS 251Introduction to Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170

This course provides a high-level overview of 3D computer graphics. It is intended for game designers and artists to enable them to understand the fundamental components of graphics engines and their applications in real-time simulation and video game software. Course topics include graphics pipeline architecture, 3D transformation operations, viewing and projection, lighting and shading models, surface detail techniques, shadow algorithms, hidden object culling and removal techniques, 3D object modeling, and animation and physically-based motion control. The popular graphics programming languages (GDI plus, OpenGL, DirectX) and shader programming are also discussed in the course.

CS 260Computer Networks I: Interprocess Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 180, CS 225

This course introduces the hierarchical network communication in a distributed computing environment. Course topics cover network technologies, architecture, and protocols. The curriculum gives specific emphasis to the TCP/IP stack and in making students familiar with writing portable socket based software. It prepares students for programming multiplayer games in later semesters.

CS 261Computer Networks II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 260

This class extends the TCP/IP protocols studied in CS 260 to wireless devices. This course goes further in depth into some topics covered in the introductory networks course, as well as additional subjects of interest. Topics include TCP/IP related protocols (such as NAT, WAP, and DNS), physical media access (such as aloha, OFDM, and WIDEBAND), wireless standards and protocols and network security. The curriculum covers additional topics based on the state of the industry.

CS 280Data Structures (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225

This course introduces classical abstract data types (ADT) in computer science. ADTs provide the hierarchical views of data organization used in programming. Among the topics covered are the algorithms and primitives of the data structures for arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables, and graphs. In addition, the course provides an introduction to algorithm complexity and notation.

CS 300Advanced Computer Graphics I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250

This course introduces students to algorithms that are essential to creating photorealistic images in interactive simulations. Topics covered include an overview of modern GPU (graphics processor unit) architecture and the common graphics APIs used, including OpenGL and DirectX. Rendering techniques covered include texturing, illumination models, transparency, shading algorithms, mapping techniques (bump mapping, environment/reflection mapping, etc.), and shadows. Students learn how to implement all algorithms by using vertex and pixel shaders.

CS 311Introduction to Databases (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L

This course provides students with a broad overview of database systems. It presents the fundamentals, practices, and applications of computer databases. Topics include database architectures, data modeling, design schemes, relational algebra, query languages, transaction processing, and database implementation. Students will explore massively multiplayer online games (MMOG) to examine a case study of database design and implementation.

CS 315Low-Level Programming (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 100, CS 100L, CS 120, CS 120L, CS 180

This course introduces students to modern microprocessor architectures using x86 series for case studies. In this course, students are expected to write both assembly language programs and to use assembly language to optimize various C/C++ programs. Topics may include pipelining, superscalar/ VLIW machines, register-renaming, out-of-order execution, multi-core architecture, caches, multicore-cache coherency, x86 instruction set architecture, application binary interfaces, Flynn’s taxonomy, and Streaming SIMD extensions.

CS 325User Interface and User Experience Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course presents fundamental topics in the field of human-computer interface design. Topics covered in the course will help students understand human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques and evaluation methods for human-computer interfaces, with special emphasis on natural user interfaces. The course will guide the students towards an implementation of a novel user interaction.

CS 330Algorithm Analysis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, CS 225, CS 280

This course provides students with an introduction to the analysis of algorithms, specifically proving their correctness and making a statement about their efficiency. Topics for discussion may include loop invariants, strong mathematical induction and recursion, asymptotic notation, recurrence relations, and generating functions. Students examine examples of algorithm analysis from searching and sorting algorithms.

CS 350Advanced Computer Graphics II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 300

This course deals with the efficient representation and processing of complex 3D scenes in order to avoid bottlenecks in the use of the CPU and the GPU. Specific topics include a variety of spatial data structures (binary space-partitioning trees, octrees, kd-trees, and grid data structures), several object-culling methods (occlusion, viewport, and portal), and finally the construction and uses of bounding volumes and their hierarchies for collision detection and related geometric operations.

CS 355Parallel Programming (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 330

This course presents an introduction to multi-threaded and distributed programming. The course covers some classical problems and synchronization mechanisms, as well as modern libraries that support parallel programming. The course also covers distributed programming models and applications to video game programming.

CS 365Software Engineering (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225

This course covers a wide range of topics in software engineering from the practical standpoint. It encompasses project management issues as well as technical development principles and methods. Topics include system architecture, security, methodologies and notation, UML, object oriented analysis and design, requirements analysis, implementation, verification, validation, maintenance, and software engineering standards. Risk management and iterative design receive special emphasis. Student teams apply acquired knowledge to a substantial project.

CS 370Computer Imaging (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280

This course introduces students to computer imaging where image analysis and image processing are unified to provide a useful paradigm for both computer vision and image processing applications. Students use C++ to implement different algorithms introduced in the course. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to have gained a general understanding of the fundamentals of digital image processing and computer vision. They also have achieved a familiarity with the current analytical tools that are used in computer imaging applications and the ability to design and develop basic algorithms to solve computer-imaging problems.

CS 375Compilers and Interpreters (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 330, MAT 258

This course presents fundamental topics in the field of compiler construction. Topics covered in the course will help students understand and implement a compiler for a high-level programming language. The course will guide the students towards an in-depth understanding of compilation techniques and runtime implementation for a modern programming language.

CS 380Artificial Intelligence for Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280

This course introduces students to a wide range of concepts and practical algorithms that are commonly used to solve game AI problems. Case studies from real games are used to illustrate the concepts. Students have a chance to work with and implement core game AI algorithms. Topics covered include the game AI programmer mindset, AI architecture (state machines, rule-based systems, goal-based systems, trigger systems, smart terrain, scripting, message passing, and debugging AI), movement, pathfinding, emergent behavior, agent awareness, agent cooperation, terrain analysis, planning, and learning/adaptation.

CS 381Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 330, MAT 258

This course covers fundamental areas of Artificial Intelligence, including various search algorithms, game playing, constraint satisfaction problems, propositional and first-order logic, and planning. The course will also explore practical skills relevant to implementation of AI techniques, practices, and design solutions.

CS 385Machine Learning (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 381

This course introduces a wide range of machine learning techniques. The topics include early machine learning algorithms like genetic algorithms, classifier systems, neural networks, and various clustering algorithms. Then, the course explores probabilistic algorithms like Bayesian networks, hidden Markov models, and Monte Carlo methods.

CS 388Introduction to Portable Game System Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250, GAM 250

This course introduces students to portable game systems programming and development, which is different from PC programming and development due to the embedded structure of the machine. Students work with a very limited amount of memory and CPU power. To overcome the system’s memory limitations, several graphics techniques are used, such as tile based game objects and backgrounds using color palettes. As for the CPU limitations, fixed point decimal is used instead of float numbers, along with asynchronous operations. Several portable game system specific topics, such as managing multiple graphics engines simultaneously and handling the touch pad are discussed.

CS 391Code Analysis and Optimization (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280, CS 315

This course focuses on understanding the details for the computer, compiler, and language, specifically how to apply these towards practical problem of solving crashes and performance issues. The emphasis is not only on knowing what and why, but also about taking that knowledge and creating useful tools and techniques for solving these problems.

CS 399Special Topics in Computer Science (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required.

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

CS 420Graphics File Format and Data Compression Techniques (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250, CS 280

This course covers data compression techniques for still images and multimedia. Students learn the theory behind data compression and how it is used in specific formats. Methods covered include run-length encoding, Huffman coding, dictionary compression, transforms, and wavelet methods. Students learn these techniques by examining various popular graphic file formats such as BMP, JPEG, DXTn, and MPEG.

CS 460Advanced Animation and Modeling (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 300, CG 130, MAT 300

3D animation and modeling play significant roles in computer simulation and video game software. Game developers need to have a comprehensive understanding of these techniques. This course introduces algorithms for specifying and generating motion for graphical objects. It addresses practical issues, surveys accessible techniques, and provides straightforward implementations for controlling 3D moving entities with different characteristics. The class covers two broad categories. Students will first learn an interpolation-based technique, which allows programmers to fill in the details of the motion or shape once the animator specifies certain basic information, such as key frames, paths, coordinate grids, or destination geometry. Then, they learn a behavior-based technique, which generates motion that satisfies a set of rules, such as kinematics, physics, or other constraints.

CS 488Introduction to Console Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250, GAM 250

This course introduces students to the game development process on a gaming console platform. It covers both the technical features and design considerations of console development. Topics covered include an overview of game console hardware and comparison with the PC environment, memory management, asynchronous data loading, graphics API, reading optical and motion sensor data, optimization, and NAND data management. As students learn the material, they work on a game project that takes advantage of the unique capabilities of gaming consoles.

CS 500Ray Tracing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 350

Entrance into the Master of Science in Computer Science program is an alternative prerequisite for this course.

In this course, students are introduced to the basic techniques used in ray tracing, including intersection calculations, illumination models, and anti-aliasing. The underlying physical and mathematical underpinnings are also discussed, as well as the practical aspects of how to implement a ray tracer.

CS 525Object-Oriented Design and Programming (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course focuses on object-oriented design and programming using the C++ programming language. It is targeted at the graduate student that is already fluent in one or more programming languages. Among the language-specific topics included are pointers, pointer arithmetic, dynamic memory management, namespaces, scope, operator overloading, generic programming (templates), the Standard Template Library, and standard compliance. Object-oriented topics will cover analysis and design considerations. Students considering this course need to have programming fluency in another imperative language, preferably with some basic knowledge of C++. After successfully completing this course, students should have a much deeper understanding of the subtleties and complexities of using object-oriented facilities of the C++ programming language, the standard programming language used in the game industry today.

CS 529Fundamentals of Game Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course presents techniques in real-time interactive simulation and video game implementations. It introduces the 2D and 3D game engine architecture, including game and system components separation, game flow, game state manager, handling input/output, and the frame rate controller. The course introduces students to the game development environment, such as Windows programming SDK and graphics library DirectX API. It also covers commonly practiced techniques such as space partitioning, AI techniques, particle systems, and collision algorithms. Several physics techniques are discussed and implemented, such as jump and reflection, in addition to behavior algorithms, such as state machines. Different game genres are explained, including Asteroids (2D), Platform (2D), Brix (2D), and Pong (3D). Students learn how to implement and extend collision, matrix, and vector libraries, according to the specific requirements for different games.

CS 530Advanced Game Engine Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 529, CS 541

A game engine is a complex framework or library that provides vital functionalities to any video game independent of the game content or genre. A well-designed game engine must at least provide the following functionalities: data management, rendering, networking, dynamics, input controllers, audio, editing tools, modeling tools, and a high-level application programming interface (API) for the entire framework that hides the lowlevel details of graphics, networking, and audio programming. Thus, a game engine is a complex library consisting of various components that must all be efficiently integrated into a single framework using the principles of object-oriented design. In this course, students study the computer graphics, mathematics, data structures, and algorithms required to design and architect a game engine that can handle complex graphics applications that handle 3D data, such as games and computer-aided design.

CS 541Advanced Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 241, MAT 250

In this course, students study algorithms and techniques that are designed to improve efficiency and increase the realism of 3D graphics. Two main subjects are discussed: techniques that add details on object surfaces, including lighting and shading models, texture mapping, bump mapping, environmental mapping and shadow algorithms; and algorithms that eliminate invisible polygons/objects from being further processed by the graphics pipeline, including BSPTree, occlusion, portal, and others.

CS 550Physics Simulation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PHY 300 or PHY 500

This course will cover the implementation of various physics topics, as well as collision detection and collision resolution algorithms. Special topics such as stacking, soft-bodies, and friction may be covered.

CS 560Advanced Animation and Modeling I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 529, CS 541, MAT 500

3D animation and modeling play significant roles in computer simulation and video game software. Game developers need to have a comprehensive understanding of these techniques. This course introduces algorithms for specifying and generating motion for graphical objects. It addresses practical issues, surveys accessible techniques, and provides straightforward implementations for controlling 3D moving entities with different characteristics. The course covers two broad categories. Students first learn an interpolation-based technique, which allows programmers to fill in the details of the motion or shape once the animator specifies certain basic information, such as key frames, paths, coordinate grids, or destination geometry. Then they learn a behavior-based technique, which generates motion that satisfies a set of rules, such as kinematics, physics, or other constraints.

CS 561Advanced Animation and Modeling II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 560 or CS 460

This course is the continuation of Advanced Animation and Modeling I. It introduces students to advanced animation and modeling algorithms and techniques in some special areas to increase the physical realism of dynamic objects in 3D graphical environments. The topics include group object (particles, fish, and birds) control, natural phenomena (water, snow, soil, smoke, and fire) simulation, plant (trees and grass) modeling, facial animation (expression and speech synchronization), and deformable object modeling.

CS 562Advanced Real-Time Rendering Techniques (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 300 or CS 541

This course introduces students to data structures, algorithms, and techniques concerned with rendering images more accurately and efficiently in interactive computer simulations and video game software. Topics include patch and surface algorithms, terrain rendering techniques, anti-aliasing theory and practice, advanced lighting techniques, hard and soft shadow map methods, multi-pass rendering techniques, high-dynamic range (HDR) rendering, advanced shading and mapping, and real-time vertex/pixel shader programming essentials. Additionally, students practice these subjects by working with the supporting OpenGL or DirectX libraries.

CS 570Computer Imaging (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The course introduces students to computer imaging where image analysis and image processing are unified to provide a useful paradigm for both computer vision and image processing applications. Students use C++ to implement different algorithms introduced in the course. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to have gained a general understanding of the fundamentals of digital image processing and computer vision. They also have achieved a familiarity with the current analytical tools that are used in computer imaging applications and the ability to design and develop basic algorithms to solve computer-imaging problems.

CS 571Advanced Computer Imaging (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 570 or ECE 420

This course introduces the computer vision pipeline. Students understand and implement state-of-the-art methods in image analysis, feature detection, face recognition and computational photography. This course provides computational skills that are complementary to the computer graphics curriculum and reinforces learning activities with a hands-on implementation approach.

CS 580Artificial Intelligence in Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces students to a wide range of concepts and practical algorithms that are commonly used to solve video game AI problems. Case studies from real games are used to illustrate the concepts. Students have a chance to work with and implement core game AI algorithms. Topics covered include the game AI programmer mindset, AI architecture, such as state machines, rule-based systems, goal-based systems, trigger systems, smart terrain, scripting, message passing, and debugging AI, movement, pathfinding, emergent behavior, agent awareness, agent cooperation, terrain analysis, planning, and learning/adaptation.

CS 581Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course covers important AI areas, including search algorithms, knowledge representation, production systems, game playing, uncertainty handling, learning, and planning. Students are required to have basic knowledge of data structures, probability theory, and mathematical logic. Upon successful completion of this course, students have gained an understanding of the skills relevant to modern AI techniques, practices, and design solutions.

CS 582Reasoning Under Uncertainty (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 380 or CS 580, CS 381 or CS 581

This course covers important AI topics, including hidden Markov models and advanced search algorithms (D-lite and cooperative path finding). Students also examine uncertainty handling (Dempster-Shafer theory), learning (kernel machines), and advanced topics in planning (conditional and adversarial planning).

CS 598Computer Science Seminar (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Every semester, guest speakers, faculty members, and/ or graduate students offer to DigiPen students a number of presentations that cover different research topics in computer science. Each speaker decides on the choice of topic, but they usually are within the general boundaries of students’ courses of study. This seminar aims not to pursue any particular topic but rather to explore new research in more depth to allow students to develop their own skills in theoretical analysis. Each speaker’s paper(s) are available to students. They are required to read these papers and to choose one to expand upon for a final paper and an oral presentation.

CS 599Special Topics in Computer Science (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it's offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

CS 601Master's Thesis I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is the first part of the master’s program thesis. The student works with the thesis advisory committee to select a research topic, to conduct a complete survey of existing techniques and algorithms in the related field, to identify fundamental knowledge, and to collect materials and tools that are essential to his or her research work. Upon completion of the course, the student produces a written document to summarize the above steps. In this document, the student is also encouraged to include an original idea of proposed approaches to the problem.

CS 602Master's Thesis II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 601

This course is the second part of the master’s program thesis. Students continue to work under the supervision of the thesis advisory committee to create the theory of the proposed research topic, to develop algorithms, and to possibly create a prototype to verify the theory and methods. Upon completion of the course, the student must submit his or her formal written thesis to the advisory committee to summarize the research and pass the oral exam to defend the thesis.

CSX 510 Scripting For Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course presents topics in computer programming, assuming no prior background experience in the subject. Emphasis is on automation of tasks. Topics may include: logic, program flow, variables, operators, conditionals, loops, and functions. Students are exposed to at least one current industry standard scripting language used by artists in the film and video games industries.

MCM 600Masters Continuous Matriculation (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Maintaining continuous registration is a requirement for graduate students. Students who have completed most course requirements but are finishing their thesis or are satisfying incomplete grades must register to maintain continuous matriculation. This credit may not be applied toward degree completion requirements.

Department of Digital Arts

CG 1022D Raster Graphics and Animation for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125 or ART 126

Concurrent Course(s): CG 125

This course introduces students to industry-standard software and practices of raster graphics and animation. The course begins with basic information, such as interface organization strategies, system components, bit depth, resolution, memory management, and output strategies. Then it explores techniques and critical thinking skills for digital painting, scanning, character development and animation for 2D games. Additionally, it looks at basic interface customization options and strategies in 2D raster graphics.

CG 125Introduction to 3D Production for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125 or ART 126

Concurrent Course(s): CG 102

This course introduces game design students to current software and production process of 3D animation, with a focus on implementing the art assets into a game engine. The course begins with basic information, such as interface organization strategies, equipment options, and production elements. The class also introduces techniques for texture mapping, modeling, rigging, lighting, cameras, and animation. Additionally, it looks at basic interface customization options and strategies in 3D graphics, culminating in a series of applied problems in 3D production techniques.

CG 1303D Computer Animation Production I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces students to the basic theories and techniques of 3D computer animation. The curriculum emphasizes standard 3D modeling techniques, including polygonal and spline modeling, texture map creation and application, keyframing, and animating through forward kinematics and inverse kinematics.

CG 2012D Raster Graphics and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, ART 101, ART 125

This course introduces students to the industry-standard software and practices of raster graphics and animation. The course begins with basic information, such as interface organization strategies, system components, bit depth, resolution, memory management, and output strategies. It also explores techniques and critical thinking skills for digital painting, scanning, still compositing, and texture creation. Additionally, it looks at basic interface customization options and strategies in 2D raster graphics.

CG 225Introduction to 3D Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 101, ART 101, ART 125

This course introduces students to industry-standard software and practices of 3D animation. The course begins with basic information such as interface organization strategies, equipment options, and production elements. It also introduces techniques and critical thinking skills for texture mapping, modeling, rigging, lighting, cameras, and animation. Additionally, it looks at basic interface customization options and strategies in 3D graphics, culminating in a series of applied problems in 3D production techniques.

CG 2512D Vector Graphics and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 201

This course examines the principles and practices of 2D vector graphics and animation. It introduces students to industry-standard software, output options, and production strategies for using vector graphics in both graphic design and animation. The course gives special consideration to critical thinking and refinement strategies when modifying vector images. Students examine methods of using vector-based tools for creating web and broadcast animation; the course concludes with a series of applied problems in 2D vector animation.

CG 2753D Character Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 225

Students continue to explore and exercise the concepts and techniques of 3D animation through a series of assignments applied to characters. Exercises in this course are considerably more demanding than those completed in CG 225 as they are longer and require more refinement, subtlety, and creativity. The course emphasizes character development - the expression of personality, mood, thought, and attitude through motion and posing. It also gives special consideration to proper model rigging.

CG 3003D Environment and Level Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course introduces students to the principles of 3D environment design. Theatrical sets, architectural simulations, and level design are considered. In order to provide students with a broader skill set, this course also presents the mechanics of how to use other 3D animation software, with an emphasis on the unique strengths of the package. Students explore the comparative strengths of different software packages and the impact that this has on workflow. The course emphasizes critical thinking skills and strategies for tool selection.

CG 3013D Environment Design for Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 310, CG 102, CG 125

This course provides game design students with an understanding of the design and production process of environments for 3D games. It introduces the principles of 3D environment creation and provides a functional working knowledge of modeling, texturing and lighting skills within the framework of a 3D modeling package to create believable and well designed environments. Student work is implemented into a game engine.

CG 303Hard Surface Modeling and Texturing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

Building on the knowledge and skills for modeling taught in CG 275, this course focuses on the process for optimized modeling and texturing of non-organic scene elements including architecture, props, and vehicles. Students are also introduced to digital sculpting for hard surface models.

CG 305Digital Sculpture (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course introduces an array of digital modeling, sculpting, and painting techniques with a set of industry-standard 3D and 2D tools. After a series of exercises, students learn the tools and work flow of digital sculpting and enhance their knowledge of anatomy. As part of this class, students create a highly finished 3D character that is fully designed, modeled, posed, sculpted, and textured. They also demonstrate knowledge of environmental sculpting.

CG 310Game Team Art Production I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course consists of the production of art for a game team. Students devise a production schedule at the beginning of the course. Evaluation of the art production comes from a faculty member who oversees the production milestones.

CG 311Game Team Art Production II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 310

This course is a continuation of CG 310, consisting of the production of art for a game team. Students devise a production schedule at the beginning of the course. Evaluation of the art production comes from a faculty member who oversees the production milestones.

CG 315Texturing for 3D (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 201, CG 275

This class focuses on how to generate efficient and accurate texture maps. Students explore techniques for generating landscape, architectural, objects, and character based textures. Topics include: clamped textures, tileable textures, advanced methods for generating normal maps, z-depth, displacement, and emissive type textures. Students will explore UV mapping, unwrapping, multi-layered shaders, animated texturing methods, use of photo reference, manipulation, compositing and other techniques to create complex textures.

CG 330Hair and Cloth Simulation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course focuses on concepts and tools for the construction and simulation of hair and clothing models in 3D animation. Students explore techniques for generating models suitable for simulation, and the complexities inherent in simulating their behavior in the context of animation. Topics may include: evaluating and interpreting reference material, using a simulator, using parameters to control behavior, UV parameter assignment and texturing, detailing a model, fixing simulation problems, and shading and lighting as it pertains to their models.

CG 350Graphics for Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 300

This course examines the unique problems of creating graphics for games, and it teaches effective production techniques for addressing these issues.

CG 360Lighting and Rendering (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 201 or FLM 210, CG 275

CG artists must develop strong lighting skills. This course looks at the subject through the world of film cinematography and covers the process of lighting both interior and exterior virtual environments. At the technical and artistic levels, students explore rendering techniques and strategies that efficiently produce a more convincing result.

CG 375Character Rigging (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course exposes students to rigging techniques. All students will share models and texture sets and work on learning industry best practices for professional grade character rigs.

CG 399Special Topics in Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

CG 400Advanced 3D Modeling Techniques (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course focuses on the design and production of highly detailed models for use in feature and broadcast animation. Students use a best-of-breed approach to define their tool set, with particular emphasis placed on organization and structure. Additional emphasis is placed on generating layered digital intermediate files for use in a model-composite workflow in a desktop production environment. Lectures also cover environment and character design research as relevant to detail modeling, presented in a framework of industry-standard geometries and methods. Students also explore advanced material creation using a global illumination-capable rendering engine, incorporating advanced texture creation techniques.

CG 410Effects Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 360, FLM 360

This course explores the technical and creative elements required to rig and animate effects. Topics include animating particle effects, fluids, and soft and rigid body dynamics. Students are required to integrate the various effects into a live action shot.

CG 5013D Concepts and Production (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Students are introduced to the computer graphics production pipeline with emphasis on latest industry practices and techniques. Project work includes planning, tasking, concept art, production, and output. Professional portfolio practices are emphasized.

CG 521Organic and Hard Surface Modeling (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 501

This course explores a variety of modeling techniques for both man-made and organic surfaces.

CG 525Digital Painting: Composition and Color (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course covers the principles of composition and color theory in developing atmosphere, narrative, and information presentation in digital media. The limitations of digital color production, organization of the third dimension in digital environments, and issues of lighting and texture are explored.

CG 570Digital Painting: Matte and Background (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 525

This course examines the methods required to combine 2D and 3D art for cinematic, computer animation and gaming environments. Issues of scale, perspective, palette and color matching, atmospheric perspective and lighting, parallax, horizon and eye level are addressed in a series of exercises designed to create convincing interaction of 2D and 3D art in interior scenes, cityscapes, and landscapes in a variety of media.

CG 577Facial Rigging and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 555

Students of this class are exposed to a variety of techniques to rig and animate the human face. Production techniques are introduced to help students improve their skills and decide which course of action is best suited for different projects. Key topics may include: lip sync, muscle bulging, phonemes vs. visemes, and scripts for rigs.

CG 599Special Topics in Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

CG 605Digital Sculpting (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 501

This course introduces an array of digital modeling, sculpting, and painting techniques with a set of industry-standard 3D and 2D tools. Students practice sculpting, modeling, posing, anatomy, texturing, and workflow.

CG 620Lighting and Rendering (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 501

This course introduces advanced lighting techniques in a 3D scene. A variety of output formats are presented and students are exposed to solutions for various media projects.

CG 661Advanced Character Creation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 522

This course exercises advanced character creation theory and techniques. Students should bring evolved ideas and concepts to design and create a comprehensive character. Other than the techniques of digital painting, sculpting, organic and hard surface modeling, texturing, advanced shading, lighting and rendering, some additional challenges such as cloth, hair, and fur simulation may be introduced as well.

CG 675Character Rigging (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 501

This course is designed to teach students how to effectively rig biped and quadruped characters for games or films. This class explores multiple methods for providing industry-standard solutions in a timely and efficient manner. Topics may include: building a hierarchy of joints, creating flexible controls for characters, dynamic simulation, and scripting for rigging.

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

ECE 101LIntroduction to Engineering Projects (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides an introduction to ECE projects by pairing up students with an engineering team in a monitored environment. Students are assigned a project advisor and placed with a team that is typically enrolled in an upper-division project course. They are exposed to topics, such as the project development process, engineering practices, hardware design techniques, and software implementation issues.

ECE 110CE 1st Year Project (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 100, CS 100L

This course introduces students to the basics of the Computer Engineering field. This is done by presenting overviews of diverse subjects such as, but not limited to: the history of computer engineering, the electronics development cycle, professional ethics, multidisciplinary team environments, and common development tools used in industry. Students are expected to apply this and previous knowledge to completing a project involving an embedded microprocessor.

ECE 200Electrical Circuits (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 100, CS 100L, MAT 200, PHY 200

This course covers analog circuits. Topics in the course usually include the following: passive components, series and parallel circuits, two-terminal networks, circuit reduction, impedance analysis, waveform measurement, operational amplifiers, passive and active filters, circuit step response, and circuit analysis using Laplace transforms. Integration of analog subsystems into digital circuits is emphasized. Additionally, students are expected to learn how their analog and digital circuit designs are affected by capacitive and inductive effects.

ECE 210Digital Electronics I (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 100, CS 100L

This course focuses on digital circuit design. Topics include combinational and sequential logic, logic families, state machines, timers, digital/analog conversion, memory devices, and microprocessor architecture. Integral to this course are hands-on laboratories where students design, build, and test many of the circuits presented in lecture.

ECE 220LCE 2nd Year Project (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ECE 110 or GAM 150, CS 100, CS 100L, ENG 110

In this course, students are expected to design and build a device using components such as integrated circuits and embedded microprocessors, usually taking the form of a robot or electronic toy. The device interacts with people or the environment, and it demonstrates digital communication. This course introduces concepts of software engineering and process documentation, and emphasizes system-level design. Students are expected to learn the process of creating a device from documenting their concept to building an initial prototype.

ECE 260Digital Electronics II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ECE 210

As a continuation of Digital Electronics I, this course has an emphasis on programmable logic. Topics include advanced state machine design techniques and an introduction to hardware description languages (such as Verilog and VHDL). Lectures are reinforced with hands-on laboratory work involving complex programmable logic devices and field programmable gate arrays. Students are expected to complete a final project that utilizes programmable logic design.

ECE 270Real-Time Operating Systems (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280

In this course, students are introduced to programming for real-time embedded systems. This course covers topics including multi-tasking, synchronization, context switching, scheduling, interrupt handling, application loading, fault tolerance, and reliability testing. Students are expected to implement their own real-time operating system for an embedded microprocessor platform.

ECE 300Embedded Microcontroller Systems (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 260 or ECE 220L, CS 170, CS 170L

This course covers topics needed to build the hardware and software for embedded devices. Core topics include microcontroller and microprocessor systems architecture, embedded system standards, and inter-process communication protocols. Additional topics may include: performance measurement, peripherals and their interfaces, board buses, memory interfaces, other modern communication protocols, and system integration.

ECE 310LCE 3rd Year Project I (5 cr.)

In this course, students work in small teams to design, build, program, document, and test an interactive embedded device. Students are expected to integrate a microprocessor with various peripheral devices such as storage, input, sensors, and display devices, into a portable embedded platform. Moreover, they are expected to develop team management skills, presentation skills, and critical design processes, as well as study and implement the theory behind human-machine interaction and interface devices.

ECE 350Control Systems (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 225, MAT 256

This course presents mathematical methods of describing systems, with a focus on linear negative feedback control systems. Topics covered typically include signals and systems, Laplace and Fourier transforms, block diagrams, transfer functions, time-domain modeling, and error and stability analysis. Work is done analytically and numerically with examples from computer, electrical, and aerospace engineering, communications, and mechatronics. Additionally, students are introduced to the implementation of feedback control in embedded systems.

ECE 360LCE 3rd Year Project II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280, ECE 310L

In this course, students work in small teams to complete a portable interactive embedded device that was started in ECE 310L. Teams are expected to develop a system that integrates software and hardware in a real-time environment. Development includes component selection, design, testing, implementation, and demonstration. Students are expected to provide a framework for applications on the device and to showcase their final project with a simple application.

ECE 390CE Internship I (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ECE 270, ECE 310L

The ECE internship is a monitored work or service experience in an ECE-related professional environment. The student intern, faculty advisor, and internship provider will agree on intentional learning goals and a method of evaluation. Due to the professional nature of the work, there is a high degree of responsibility associated with this course. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available from the Administration Office.

ECE 399Special Topics in Computer Engineering (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ECE 400Motors and Sensors (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PHY 270

An electronic system is useless unless it interacts with the outside world. Students have used sensors and actuators before, but in this course, they examine them in more detail. They develop their understanding of the capabilities and limitations of some popular sensors. Additionally, they study the physical principles behind an electrical motor/generator. Topics in this course include three-phase circuits, transformers, power transmission, motors and generators, stepper motors and encoders, motor controllers, limit switches, and sensors (optical, acoustic, eddy current, and triangulation).

ECE 410LCE 4th Year Project I (5 cr.)

ECE 410L is the first semester of the CE program capstone project. Students working in teams are expected to develop a system that integrates software and hardware in a real-time environment. Students are responsible for all aspects of the project, including component selection, design, testing, and implementation. In addition to the project work, there will be weekly lectures covering communication and professional skills (e.g., interview preparation, resume/CV writing, presentations) and engineering skills (e.g., engineering management, testing and quality control, statistical methods).

ECE 420Digital Signal Processing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 225, MAT 256, MAT 258

This course focuses on signals represented by a sequence of numbers or symbols and the processing of these signals. Topics in this course include continuous, discrete and fast-Fourier transforms, z-transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, finite impulse response, and infinite impulse response filters. Work is done analytically and numerically with examples from areas such as computer and electrical engineering, communications, and various scientific fields. Additionally, students are introduced to the implementation of digital signal processors in embedded systems.

ECE 460LCE 4th Year Project II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ECE 410L

ECE 460L is the second semester of the CE program capstone project. Students working in teams are expected to develop a system that integrates software and hardware in a real-time environment. Students are responsible for the project description, component selection, design, testing, implementation, and demonstration. In addition to the project work, there will be weekly lectures covering communication and professional skills (e.g., interview preparation, resume/CV writing, presentations) and engineering skills (e.g., engineering management, testing and quality control, statistical methods).

ECE 490CE Internship II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ECE 270, ECE 310L

The ECE internship is a monitored work or service experience in an ECE-related professional environment. The student intern, faculty advisor, and internship provider agree on intentional learning goals and a method of evaluation. Due to the professional nature of the work, there is a high degree of responsibility associated with this course. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available from the Administrative Office.

Department of Fine Arts

ART 101The Language of Drawing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for ART 101 or ART 102, but not for both.

This course explores the nature of drawing as a language skill and the use of drawing by production artists and animators. Applied drawing goals and critical thinking skills are given special consideration. Students are introduced to basic professional habits in drawing practice, drill, and play. Design principles, basic research, and the design process are introduced and applied to a series of practical problems. This course also explores basic drawing materials, drawing strategy, drawing sequence, linear drawing methodology, practice, and theory.

ART 102Fundamentals of Visual Expression (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for ART 101 or ART 102, but not for both.

Students will be introduced to simple drawing techniques, constructed linear perspective, visual design methodology, and drawing vocabulary through lectures, studio assignments, and simple projects.

ART 105Art Processes (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides a basic working knowledge of the processes used in making art. Topics include the origins and techniques involving drawing, tone, color, composition and artistic process as well as a simple overview of art history.

ART 110Fundamentals of Visual Communication and Design Process (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Beginning with the physiology of perception, this course explores the simple building blocks of visual communications and how the viewer understands and responds to shapes, symbols, and images. The foundational skills of design process and problem-solving methodologies are explored to develop the student's visual problem-solving skills.

ART 111Introduction to Ceramics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course builds a foundation in ceramic arts. It provides the opportunity to learn basic techniques of the ceramic process, which include hand-building techniques, wheel throwing, and glazing.

ART 115Art and Technology (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides an overview of art history from Paleolithic times until the modern day. It traces the technological advances of society and art and considers the interplay between art and technology. Classical art materials and methods are examined, and students explore how art has historically impacted society. This course has a worldwide scope and is not limited to just European and Western traditions.

ART 125Tone, Color and Composition (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 101

Credit maybe received for either ART 125 or ART 126, not both.

This course continues to build upon students’ abilities to draw by exploring the nature and use of tone, color, and composition in drawing. It emphasizes methods of creating tone, ways to use luminance as an organizational element, and the importance of thinking critically. Additionally, the course introduces students to a variety of classical tonal systems and tonal illusions, including atmospheric perspective, sculptural modeling, basic direct lighting, lighting position relative to viewpoint, light intensity, local value, and reflectivity. Students then explore the artistic use of color. The course covers systems and traditions of organizing hue and saturation, and it examines methods of building from tonal preliminary studies. Students also explore classical forms of compositional organization, such as symmetry, asymmetry, golden mean, and figure-ground relationships.

ART 126Principles of Composition and Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 101 or ART 102

Credit may be received for ART 125 or ART 126, but not for both.

This course continues to build on students' abilities to draw by exploring techniques for producing finished drawings, quick explanatory sketches, and rapid visualizations. Methods for use of tone and color to convey mood and atmosphere are covered. Basic graphic design and typography are taught with particular emphasis on interface design. Classical forms of compositional organization, such as symmetry, asymmetry, golden mean, and figure ground relationships are also explored.

ART 151Basic Life Drawing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 101

This course introduces students to the challenges of drawing the human form for animation. Students examine life drawing for animation in addition to methods for attaining these goals. The course emphasizes capturing skeletal structure, muscle form, emotion, and gesture. By drawing clothed and nude models of both genders, students learn to apply lessons in anatomy to the figure, significantly expanding their understanding of human kinetics and structure. Additionally, students practice extrapolating basic human life drawing strategies to other animals.

ART 201Advanced Life Drawing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125, ART 151

This course builds upon the anatomy and drawing courses students have already taken. Students continue to improve their ability to capture kinetics in humans and animals. By engaging in a series of exercises designed to enhance their visual memory, students build the foundation for drawing accurate figures from their imagination. They also explore putting the figure into an environment, figurative composition, and introductory sequential figurative composition.

ART 210Art Appreciation (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This introduction to art provides students with a better understanding of artistic influences on modern culture. Along with the history of art, students study the meanings, purposes, styles, elements, and principles of art and the various media used to create works of art. In helping students gain basic awareness, knowledge, and enjoyment of the visual arts, the course provides the groundwork for further personal study in the arts. In turn, this influences the development of their creativity.

ART 222Ceramics: Hand Building (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 111

This course builds upon hand-building techniques learned in Introduction to Ceramics (ART 111). Surface texture techniques and basic mold-making will be explored, all while working in the certainty of 3D.

ART 223Ceramics: Wheel Throwing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 111

This course focuses on building skills developed in Introduction to Ceramics (ART 111) to produce simple forms on the potter's wheel such as cylinders, bowls, and plates.

ART 2253D Design and Sculpture (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 201

This course introduces students to the principles of 3D design using both traditional and digital tools. Students become acquainted with additive, subtractive, and cast sculpture. They consider the basic concepts of architectural space, interior design, landscape design, surface interplay with light, lofted forms, and skinning systems. Students use modern polymer clays and build an animation maquette.

ART 226Gesture Drawing for Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): BIO 150 or ART 110, ART 101, ART 151

In this course, the student is provided with significant time in front of live moving models. The main purpose of drawing moving models is to describe what the model is doing as opposed to what the form of the model is. All aspects of the drawing, including form, line, silhouette, details, and most importantly, line of action, concentrate on communicating visually what the model is doing and/or thinking. The course focuses on weight, depth, balance, tension, rhythm, and flow.

ART 228Figurative Sculpture (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 101, BIO 150

This course introduces students to the challenges of sculpting the human figure from life. Using traditional techniques to build an armature and complete a sculpture in clay, students enhance their understanding of the human form in 3D space. Emphasis is placed on gesture, proportion, and anatomy, as well as developing a strong sense of form and volume.

ART 230Painting (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125

This course explores ideas and various techniques related to painting. The use of color and the representation of space is emphasized. Students explore masterworks, studio painting, and painting en plein air. Technical and social problems related to painting are explored using portraiture, still life, and environment/landscape. A portable field easel and appropriate painting supplies will be required. The course will culminate in a group show of student projects.

ART 234Survey of Sequential Art (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125, ART 151

In this course, students will learn to explore and to exploit the power of sequential images as a medium to craft stories beyond storyboarding, photography, and film. Through the formats of the graphic novel and related forms, students will tackle problems of character and events; their solutions will be limited only by their imaginations. The course will begin with a historical overview of sequential art and will then examine storytelling through pictures, focusing on clarity and emotional impact. Students will examine contemporary styles and conventions and will be required to draw from previous art experiences, while honing their skills in drawing, perspective, design, color, typography, writing, editing, and acting. Demonstrations of multimedia techniques and computer technology relative to this field will also be introduced.

ART 240Introduction to Graphic Design and Typography (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125 or ART 126

This course will introduce fundamental visual design concepts, including composition and use of white space, identification and use of classic type families, creation and use of layout and grid construction, use of visual hierarchies, and effective usability strategies.

ART 251Character Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 201

Students leverage their drawing and anatomy knowledge to the creation of animation characters. This course introduces students to the traditions of character design and the basic structural strategies for creating animation characters. Students explore simplification gradients relative to human, animal, and inanimate object-based characters. They consider issues of costume, personality, and story interaction. The course emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality. The work completed in this course serves as pre-production design for PRJ 300, PRJ 350, or ANI 300.

ART 260Graphic Design, User Experience, and Input (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Students explore elements of visual design and apply them to computer user interfaces. They analyze various types of sensory interfaces and improve their skills in creating representations of information valuable to a system user. Additionally, emphasis is placed on the overall enjoyment of the user experience, plus consideration towards relating the user experience to the theme of the game or system. Students learn how to use various industry-standard languages related to prototype interfaces.

ART 300Perspective, Backgrounds and Layouts (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 201, CG 201

This course explores the animation pre-production skills of background and layout art. It emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality. Students are guided through classical depth cue and perspective systems as they apply this knowledge to the creation of animation backgrounds and layouts. Additionally, students explore means of using drawing to create elements such as camera lens illusions, architectural space, theatrical sets, game visual design, matte painting, and surface texture.

ART 301Concept Art Resources (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 251, CG 201, CG 275

This course builds upon all art disciplines, primarily 2D related skills, to prepare students for positions requiring the creation of concept art. Emphasis is placed on the importance of balancing speed of content generation with quality, as this is one of the most pressing and relevant challenges in this field. With this mindset, students are challenged to evaluate and understand new forms of character and environment generation. Both theory and technique are heavily stressed during this course, with the final tangible outcome being multiple portfolio pieces that demonstrate the individual’s abilities and unique style/interests.

ART 310Architectural Spaces, Design, and Lighting I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces students to the aesthetics and principles of 2D (floor plans and elevations) and 3D environment design. A survey of architectural styles from throughout the world is blended with concepts, such as emotion, mood, lighting, shadows, aesthetics, and more. The course emphasizes learning the architectural vocabulary as well as the aesthetics of environmental and game-level design. Texturing, spatial design, negative space, dramatic lighting, and other concepts that affect not only the psychology of level design but also gameplay principles are covered. Students participate in numerous field trips to local examples of architecture in order to gain an understanding of architectural spaces and the field's vocabulary.

ART 350Storyboards (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 201, ENG 116, FLM 151

This course explores the animation pre-production skills of storyboard art. Students leverage their knowledge of drawing, storytelling, and cinematography to create both production and presentation storyboards. They also explore means of using drawing to create story flow, character development, mood, time, and place. The course emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality. The work completed in this course serves as pre-production design for PRJ 300, PRJ 350, or ANI 300.

ART 360Architechtural Spaces, Design, and Lighting II: Period Styles (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 310, CG 301

This class builds on the foundational skills and knowledge from Architectural Spaces, Design, and Lighting I (ART 310), covering more period styles. Additionally, students have opportunities to do more hands-on creation of art, models, and textures relative to various periods. Students participate in a variety of field trips in order to research and analyze architectural styles and then to build them in the computer lab.

ART 399Special Topics in Art (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ART 400Drawing Fundamentals (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The development of strong drawing skills is of extreme importance since they are essential tools for expressing ideas, particularly during the pre-production stages of an animation project. Therefore, this course presents the basic elements of drawing and graphic design in order to improve the student’s practical ability to draw with skill and imagination. It covers methods of observing, describing, and organizing forms using various mediums, such as pencil, charcoal, and color pencils.

ART 401Conceptual Illustration and Visual Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 300

This course explores the animation pre-production skills of conceptual illustration and visual development. Students apply their knowledge of drawing, storytelling, and composition to create speculative drawings for animation. They review compositional systems, design process, and illustration techniques. Additionally, students explore means of using drawing to visually explore story and character ideas from both existing and original story materials. They also consider adaptation, stylization, and visual variety. The course emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality. The work completed in this course serves as pre-production design for PRJ 300, PRJ 350, or ANI 300.

ART 405Matte Painting (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 401

This course takes the student through the process of designing and painting (traditionally, digitally or both) backgrounds that can be seamlessly integrated with live action footage, animation, and games.

ART 410Mechanical Drawing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Traditional and digital skills in drafting are key components of an engineering career. This course introduces students to the basic skills of mechanical drafting including layout and formatting conventions, typographic traditions, and classical drafting tool usage. Students apply these skills to actual problems in traditional mechanical drafting. They are then exposed to modern digital tools in mechanical drafting. The course explores subjects such as interface conventions, usage strategies, and output options. Students work with a CAD program and complete a variety of exercises designed to establish foundational skills. The course pays special attention to addressing how professionals use these skills in production and prototyping.

ART 450Portfolio (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 350 or INT 390

Students use this course to compile the elements of their professional portfolio, which will serve as their BFA thesis. Additionally, this course introduces students to the marketing campaign needs of modern animation portfolios, including visual continuity, business documents, traditional still art portfolios, process and practice samples, digital portfolios, web sites, demo reels, and promotional items. They use this knowledge to assemble their own portfolios. The course also covers related information regarding job interviews, trade shows, professional standards, and contract negotiation.

ART 501Advanced Figure Drawing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This advanced course integrates with the student’s study of sculpture to express human anatomy artistically in two dimensions. Students will explore: kinetics by engaging in gesture drawing; use of line and value; figure in environment; figurative composition and sequential composition. Students will be encouraged to explore creativity and personal voice in their work.

ART 503Gesture Drawing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course focuses on drawing the figure in an interpretive manner, focusing on the action and intent of the pose. Whereas in traditional life drawing the focus is on reproduction of the figure, in this course the pose is the starting point rather than the end point. All aspects of drawing, including line, form, silhouette, details, lighting, and most importantly line of action are directed to the purpose of visually communicating action and intent. Particular attention will be paid to distribution of weight, depth, balance, tension, rhythm, and flow.

ART 504Storyboarding (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course explores the animation pre-production skills of storyboard art. Students learn to leverage their knowledge of storytelling and cinematography to create production and presentation storyboards. They also explore means of using drawing to create story flow, character development, mood, time and place. The course emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality.

ART 511Oil Painting: The Figure (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 501

This course develops observational skills through painting from life and accurately rendering the human figure. Students are encouraged to explore their own themes and refine their individual voices and style.

ART 512Plein Air Painting (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Students focus on exploring and understanding lighting, atmospherics and space in the natural environment in both traditional and digital 2D media. Drawing, composition, color, orchestration, palette limitation, paint manipulation and edges, digital simulation, and color reproduction are examined. Studies taken from nature using critical on-location observation become the raw material leading to the creation of large studio canvases and/or digital environments.

ART 515Art History: Classical to Renaissance (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course explores the roots of western culture in ancient Greece and Rome as well as the catalyzing effect of science and technology during the Renaissance. Students are exposed to a broad range of artists and techniques. They observe how artists from the past solved design problems and use their knowledge of anatomy, perspective, iconography, etc. as a springboard to create the foundations of western representational art.

ART 516Art History: 19th to 21st Century (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 515

Students study the rapid acceleration and expansion of artistic styles, cultural influences and media, starting with the industrial revolution and continuing into the digital age. They explore their own place in the historical continuum and how its legacy impacts new art forms such as animated films and video games.

ART 517Art History: Research Seminar (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 516

Students undertake research under faculty guidance into topics relating to their thesis project, examining in depth issues of technology, cultural limits and cultural interactions, iconography, religious, political and commercial symbolism, gender bias and stereotypes and historical context in relation to the specific goals of their final body of work. Students produce a written essay on their findings and how they have integrated them in their body of work.

ART 522Character Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 501

This course focuses on the traditions of character design and the basic structural strategies for creating animation characters. Students explore simplification gradients relative to human, animal and inanimate object-based characters. They consider issues of costume, personality, props, story interaction, and– albeit obliquely– environments. The course emphasizes professional applications, techniques and standards of quality.

ART 528Advanced Figure Sculpture (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 501

This class builds on ART 501 by challenging students to apply their anatomical knowledge while sculpting from the live human figure. Using traditional techniques to build an armature and complete a sculpture in clay, students enhance their understanding of the human form in 3D space. Concepts of design, expression and personal voice will be stressed.

ART 555Anatomy: Ecorché (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Students create a scale model of the flayed human form starting with the skeletal system. Attention is focused on identifying the anatomical structures, proportion, the complex curves created by each bone or muscle, and the spatial relationships between the individual forms.

ART 599Special Topics in Art (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

Department of Game Software Design and Production

CSP 200Computer Science Project II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L, CS 230, GAM 150, MAT 140

This course is the first semester of a two-semester project, which will be continued in CSP 250, and focuses on the creation of a useful software application or tool. It provides the opportunity to work together on teams of three or more members, to implement technical features required by their chosen projects.

CSP 250Computer Science Project II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225, CSP 200

In this course, students work to complete and polish the projects they began in CSP 200.

CSP 300Computer Science Project III (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 260 or CS 365, CS 211, CS 280, CSP 250, PHY 200

This course is the first semester of a two-semester project, which will be continued in CSP 350, and focuses on the creation of an advanced software application or tool. It provides the opportunity to work together on teams of three or more members, to implement technical features required by their chosen projects.

CSP 350Computer Science Project III (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CSP 300

In this course, students work to complete and polish the projects they began in CSP 300.

CSP 400Computer Science Project IV (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CSP 350

This course is the first semester of a two-semester project, which will be continued in CSP 450, and focuses on the creation of an innovative software application or tool. It provides the opportunity to work independently or in teams, as appropriate to the scope of the project, which could include continuing to expand and improve on an earlier project.

CSP 450Computer Science Project IV (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CSP 400

In this course, students work to complete and polish their project from CSP 400.

GAM 100Project Introduction (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This class presents an overview of the way the game development industry works and a history of game development. It exposes students to the positions and job responsibilities that each member of a game development team has, along with the industry requirements for concept pitches, design documents and schedules. It also introduces sprite animation, object motion, and input processing, which students use in the creation of a game of their own design.

GAM 150Project I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120, CS 120L, GAM 100

Credit maybe received for either GAM 150 or GAM 152, not both.

This project focuses on the creation of a simple game or simulation. Students work together on teams of three or four members. All projects must be written entirely in C (C++ is not allowed) and cannot use external libraries or middleware of any kind (except those provided by the instructor). Topics include effective team communication, planning, documentation, debugging, source control, testing, and iterative software development techniques.

GAM 152Project I for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120 or CS 116, GAM 100

Credit may be received for either GAM 150 or GAM 152, not both.

This project focuses on the creation of a simple game or simulation. Students work together on teams of three or four members. All projects are created using a scripting language in a rapid development environment. Topics include effective team communication, planning, documentation, debugging, source control, testing, and iterative software development techniques.

GAM 200Project II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L, CS 230, GAM 150, MAT 140

Credit may be received for either GAM 200 or GAM 205, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of a simple real-time game or simulation with 2D graphics (3D games are not allowed). Students work together on teams of three or four members to implement technical features, such as audio effects, music playback, pattern movement, simple artificial intelligence, same-machine multiplayer (networking is not allowed), particle systems, scrolling, and simple physics. All projects must be written with a core of C++ code and cannot use middleware such as preexisting physics engines, networking engines, etc. Additional topics may include basic software architecture, essential development practices, fundamentals of team dynamics, and task prioritization methods.

GAM 205Project II for Designers (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 175, GAM 152, MAT 100

Credit may be received for either GAM 200 or GAM 205, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of a simple real-time game or simulation with 2D graphics (3D games are not allowed). Students will either work in teams made up only of BAGD students or with students from GAM 200. BAGD-only teams can use commercial game engines, middleware, or other libraries that teams with GAM 200 students cannot. Additional topics may include basic software architecture, essential development practices, fundamentals of team dynamics, and task prioritization methods.

GAM 250Project II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225, GAM 200

Credit may be received for either GAM 250 or for GAM 255, but not for both.

In this class, students work to complete and polish the projects they began in GAM 200. Additional topics may include intermediate software architecture, advanced debugging techniques, bug tracking, formal playtesting, game pacing, and game balance.

GAM 255Project II for Designers (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 176, GAM 205

Credit may be received for either GAM 250 or GAM 255, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of a simple real-time game or simulation with 2D graphics (3D games are not allowed). Students will either work in teams made up only of BAGD students or with students from GAM 200. BAGD-only teams can use commercial game engines, middleware, or other libraries that teams with GAM 200 students cannot. Additional topics may include basic software architecture, essential development practices, fundamentals of team dynamics, and task prioritization methods.

GAM 300Project III (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 200 or CS 251, CS 260 or CS 245 or CS 365, CS 280, GAM 250, PHY 200

Credit may be received for either GAM 300 or GAM 302, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of an advanced real-time game or simulation with hardware-accelerated graphics. BSCS in RTIS students work together on teams of three to five members and implement technical features, such as networking, artificial intelligence, and physics. All projects must be written with a core of C++ code and cannot use middleware, such as pre-existing physics engines, networking engines, etc. Additional topics may include advanced software architecture, 3D art pipelines, building content tools, and advanced team dynamics.

GAM 302Project III for Designers (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 250 or GAM 252, GAT 251 or CS 280, PHY 115 or PHY 200, GAT 211

Credit may be received for either GAM 300 or GAM 302, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the design of an advanced real-time game or simulation. Students work in teams either made up only of designers or with students from GAM 300. Designer-only teams can use commercial game engines, middleware, or other libraries that teams with GAM 300 students cannot. Additional topics may include online portfolios, effective presentations, managing scope, and advanced team dynamics.

GAM 350Project III (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 300

Credit may be received for either GAM 350 or GAM 352, not both.

In this class, students work to complete the projects they began in GAM 300. Additional topics may include large project software architecture, advanced testing techniques, internships, and an introduction to resumes and interviews.

GAM 352Project III for Designers (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 302

Credit may be received for either GAM 350 or GAM 352, not both.

In this class, students work to complete the projects they began in GAM 302. Additional topics may include large project design, advanced testing techniques, internships, and an introduction to resumes and interviews.

GAM 375Advanced Project (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 350 or GAM 352

In this course, individual students work to create a highly polished advanced technology demonstration or design project. With instructor approval, students could instead polish an exceptional project from a previous class to a higher standard. Topics may include advanced user interfaces and controls, advanced special effects, advanced behaviors, and creating effective demonstrations.

GAM 390Internship I (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 250 or GAT 251

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

GAM 400Project IV (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250 or GAT 251, GAM 350 or GAM 352 or GAM 390 or GAM 490

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of an innovative game, simulation, or demo. Students may use current software and hardware technologies with instructor approval, such as web technologies, gaming consoles, mobile devices, commercial physics engines, commercial game engines, hands-free input devices, etc. These technologies can be used to implement technical features, such as 3D animation, advanced lighting and rendering, advanced 3D physics, high-performance networking, and advanced AI algorithms. Innovation can also come from the design, visuals, and/or audio components of the project. Students work independently or in teams, as appropriate to the scope of their project. Additional topics may include advanced interviewing techniques and writing effective resumes.

GAM 450Project IV (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 400 or GAM 390 or GAM 490

In this class, students work to complete the projects they began in GAM 400. Additional topics may include working in the industry, professional networking, and career strategies.

GAM 490Internship II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 250 or GAT 251

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

GAM 541Masters Game Project (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 529

This project focuses on the creation of a real-time game or simulation. Students work together on teams of three to five members and implement technical features, such as audio effects, music playback, pattern movement, simple artificial intelligence, multiplayer, particle systems, scrolling, and simple physics. All projects must be written with a core of C++ code and cannot use middleware such as pre-existing physics engines, networking engines, etc. Additional topics may include an overview of the game industry, effective team communication, planning, documentation, debugging, testing, and iterative software development techniques.

GAM 550Advanced Game Project (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 541

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of an advanced real-time game or simulation using the latest techniques in graphics, real-time physics, artificial intelligence, and networking. Students may use current software and hardware technologies with instructor approval, such as web technologies, gaming consoles, mobile devices, commercial physics engines, hands-free input devices, etc. Students work independently or in teams, as appropriate to the scope of their project. Additional topics may include team dynamics, formal playtesting, game pacing, and game balance.

GAM 551Advanced Game Project (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 550

In this class, students work to complete the projects they began in GAM 550. Additional topics may include working in the industry, interviewing, resumes, professional networking, and career strategies.

GAM 590Internship I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

GAM 591Internship II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

GAMX 500Game Design, Development, and Production (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This class presents an overview of game design from concept to level through play balancing, as well as an overview of the business practices traditionally and currently common to the game industry. Students develop a small game using industry tools, focusing on basic game mechanics, verbal and nonverbal narrative development, play balancing, and basic level design fundamentals.

GAT 110Game History (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course covers the history of games from the very first games of ancient civilizations, to traditional tabletop games, to classic video games from the 20th century. Topics may include how the core mechanics of even the oldest games are still present in video games today, how games can be categorized by their core mechanics, and how social forces and technology drive changes in the games we play. Students are required to play, analyze, and modify a wide variety of games as the primary coursework of this class.

GAT 120Game Analysis (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course focuses on learning the fundamental design principles of digital games through repeated examination of existing games. Students will be taught how to analyze and reverse-engineer the designs of major works in gaming history, then will analyze a variety of games themselves. Topics may include game mechanics, actions, controls, rewards, punishment, intensity curves, teaching the player, visual aesthetics, and aural aesthetics.

GAT 210Game Mechanics I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 110, GAT 120

In this course, students start building a foundational knowledge of game mechanics by creating, analyzing, and testing non-digital dice, card, and board games of their own design. Topics may include randomness, game state, hidden information, position, designing to a specification, writing rules, and playtesting.

GAT 211Game Mechanics II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 210

This course focuses on how to create the maps, characters, and combat systems needed for combat-oriented games. Students work to create a large variety of maps, create new character types for existing games, convert specific video games into tabletop games, and build a tabletop combat-oriented game of their own design. Topics may include map types and layouts, movement, visibility, force composition, character statistics and roles, melee combat, ranged combat, damage, armor, and health.

GAT 212Advanced Game Mechanics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 211

This course focuses on the design of non-digital role-playing games and a variety of non-digital simulation games. Students work to create an original small role-playing game, a simulation game of their choice, and an additional non-digital game of any kind. Topics may include skill systems, character advancement, equipment variety, realistic combat, strategic simulations, supply systems, economic simulations, vehicle simulations, and sport simulations.

GAT 240Technology for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170 or CS 175, MAT 100 or MAT 140 or MAT 103

This course is a survey of the technologies commonly used in game development. Topics may include spreadsheets, file formats, lighting, shaders, art pipelines, networking, databases, physics engines, audio engines, and artificial intelligence. These topics are covered only at a basic level—enough to be able to use them as a designer, but not enough to be able to implement them.

GAT 2502D Game Design I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170 or CS 175, GAT 210

This course focuses on designing and implementing games using a 2D engine. Students work to create several original games in common genres, such as platformers, shooters, brawlers, or puzzle games. Topics may include aesthetics, level construction, enemy placement, resource placement, player guidance, player controls, scripting, and game mechanics in 2D.

GAT 2512D Game Design II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 211, GAT 250

This course focuses on designing and implementing some of the more complicated types of 2D games, such as role-playing games, strategy games, or economic games. Students work to create several original games in these genres, including one in the genre of their choice. Topics may include character advancement, inventory, strategic balance, diplomacy, trading, and real-time economic systems.

GAT 3153D Game Design I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 251

This course focuses on designing and implementing games using a 3D engine. Students will work to create one or more levels from start to finish, including any needed modifications to game mechanics, controls, and cameras. Topics may include aesthetics, environment building, lighting, texturing, resource placement, player guidance, player controls, camera controls, scripting, and game mechanics in 3D.

GAT 3163D Game Design II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 310, GAT 315

This course focuses on designing and implementing 3D games in specific genres, such as first-person shooters, adventure games, role-playing games, platformers, or real-time strategy games. Students work to create an original prototype for each genre covered using a 3D engine of the appropriate type. Topics may include puzzle design, platforming design, boss fight design, cover mechanics, and terrain modification for a 3D game.

GAT 330Interactive Narrative and Character Creation for Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110, GAT 251

This course focuses on how to write stories that integrate with gameplay and mechanics. From creating characters to writing branching and interactive dialogue, students work on storytelling in various genres by incorporating their stories and characters into an existing game engine. Topics may include the design and structure of dialogue trees, creating mood parameters for dialogue choices, interactive narrative, autonomous behaviors, emergent gameplay, adding emotional depth through the use of character archetypes, and weaving theme and story into the game in a way that resonates with the player.

GAT 335 Serious Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 250 or GAT 250

This course focuses on games and simulations that do not have entertainment as their primary purpose. Topics may include military training, medical training, employee training, skill training, safety training, emergency response training, educational games, advocacy games, therapeutic games, exercise games, scientific simulations, optimization simulations, and planning simulations.

GAT 399Special Topics in Game Design and Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required.

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

GAT 401 Rapid Prototyping (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225 or CS 176

This course introduces students to high-level tools for rapid prototyping of creative, interactive, multimedia experiences, using current technologies for making small, portable games. The design, development, and iterative processes commonly used for developing web-based game applications and other multimedia presentations are also covered.

GAT 405Advanced Game Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 251

This course focuses on one or more advanced game design topics based on the expertise of the instructor. Topics may include art games, music games, social games, educational games, serious games, handheld games, alternative input games, radically innovative games, and more. Students work to create one or more prototypes of a game in the areas being covered, either individually or in teams, as appropriate. Emphasis is heavily placed on innovation and students are encouraged to challenge their assumptions about what games are and what games can be.

GAT 480Senior Portfolio (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 350 or GAM 352

This one-credit course covers advanced portfolio development. Students work to organize and present their work in online, paper, and electronic media in a professional form. Topics may include targeted resumes, non-standard cover letters, advanced interviewing techniques, interactive portfolios, and voice-over videos.

GAT 501Rapid Prototyping (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 541

This graduate-level course has students use high-level tools for rapid prototyping of creative, interactive, multimedia experiences, using current technologies for making small, portable games. The design, development, and iterative processes commonly used for developing web-based game applications and other multimedia presentations will also be covered.

GAT 599Special Topics in Game Design and Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized graduate-level course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

MGT 451Project Management (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides in-depth examination of theories, techniques, and issues in project management. It covers various aspects of project management including team leadership, marketing, budgeting, long-range project planning, contract negotiations, and intellectual property considerations. The course includes exercises that give students insight into dealing with product conceptualization, team effectiveness and performance issues.

MGT 500Management for Art Directors (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides an in-depth examination of techniques and theories for project management of art, film, games and other artistic team projects. Lectures cover various aspects of managing creative teams. Topics may include leadership, communication, team building, marketing, budgeting, longrange project planning, contract negotiations and intellectual property considerations.

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences

COL 101College Life and Academic Skills (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course assists students in developing the classroom and communication skills necessary to succeed in both educational and professional situations.

COL 499Career Search Preparation: Materials, Logistics, and Communication (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This is a capstone course for students to prepare their application materials and learn how to effectively search for an entry-level job in their field. The goal of the course is for each student to have a polished resume, cover letter, business card, and online/web presence by the end of the semester, as well as a search strategy for seeking employment.

COM 150Interpersonal and Work Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

Students explore how their culture, gender, economic status, age, and other personal characteristics influence their work communications. The course explores verbal and non-verbal communication skills in a global work environment. Students learn written communication techniques most effective for use in the technology workplace. Additionally, students explore and practice negotiation skills, both internally and externally at their workplace.

COM 250Professional Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): COM 150

This course is designed to prepare students for the communication challenges that await them in the professional world. Topics covered may include professional networking strategies, career search materials, self-presentation and interview skills, and effective communication across all levels and functions of the workplace.

COM 399Special Topics in Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ECN 100Introduction to Economics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces the fundamentals of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics may include supply and demand, competition, market efficiency, auctions, barter, monopolies, externalities, welfare, unemployment, growth, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates, and budget deficits.

ECN 350Engineering Economics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course gives students a sound basis for making economic decisions in business and industry environments. Students learn how to decide which projects are worthwhile, determine priorities, and select components. Topics in this course include present worth, future amounts, cash flows, salvage value, depreciation, rates of return, income tax, basic cost accounting, and funding sources, including venture capital and SBIR. The course also covers the basics of intellectual property, patents, and copyright.

ENG 110Composition (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course focuses on generating and discussing ideas for composition and engages in all stages of the writing process, with emphasis on the development and application of critical thinking skills. The primary focus of the course is developing the ability to construct, write, and revise argumentative/persuasive essays. Assignments may also include other types of writing, such as narrative, descriptive, and comparative essays.

ENG 116Storytelling (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course covers the principal elements of storytelling including theme, character, perspective, setting, plot, and dialogue. It encompasses both visual and non-visual media, such as short stories, novels, drama, and film. Through a series of creative writing exercises, students practice developing stories with both words and images.

ENG 120Research, Reasoning, and Writing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

In this composition course, students practice advanced argumentative essay writing with a focus on research, critical analysis of the research, thesis presentation, and defense. During the semester, students write several research essays on various topics using both traditional and new information techniques.

ENG 150Mythology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course studies myths from different world cultures. It provides an in-depth discussion of the Hero’s Journey (a basic pattern that appears in many narratives) and its principal archetypes. It also studies mythology across the arts and examines how essential it is to the study of literature, drama, film and video games.

ENG 230Speculative Fiction (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course is a survey of speculative fiction (in literature, television, film, and graphic novels) that moves beyond pure realism to include fantastic or imaginative elements and to present worlds that differ significantly from our own. Each semester, the course will focus on one or more sub-genres which may include science fiction, fantasy, horror, magic realism, alternate history, steampunk, or cyberpunk.

ENG 242Multicultural Literature (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110, ENG 150

This course explores what modernity and post-modernity have or have not meant to American writers whose histories and cultures are not European in origin but whose writings are steeped in European-American literary traditions. The course explores the cultural hybridism of this literature as well the unique visions of the world they have created. These funny, humorous, bitterly satirical, and downright serious (post)- modern fantasies are quintessentially American, yet also unique and peculiar to these authors’ ethnic experiences. The selected works also offer an opportunity to read or re-read well established and newer American works of literature.

ENG 243Epic Poetry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116, ENG 150

This course provides an introduction to the literary form of the epic poem. Students gain in-depth knowledge of the form and apply this experience by adapting the epic’s themes and structures into their own creative endeavors, including video games. Students also produce an epic-based creative work as a final project in the course.

ENG 245Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course provides an introduction to the study and practice of fiction writing including characterization, plot, setting, and point of view. It presents selected works of short and long fiction. The course is an opportunity for students to practice their own creative writing skills. They are required to write at least two short stories.

ENG 246American Ethnic Literatures (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course covers prominent themes and techniques in American ethnic literatures such as Native, African, Asian, and Hispanic American literatures. Modern texts are emphasized but pre- or early 20th century classics may also be included.

ENG 250The Graphic Novel (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course provides an introduction to the study of graphic novels, a unique field of inquiry encompassing many world cultures and drawing on many disciplines. Students will read, discuss, and analyze many different types of graphic novels, such as stand-alone, serial, and adaptive books.

ENG 315Story Through Dialogue (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 116 or ENG 245

This course introduces students to the basics of screenplay writing for film beginning with the fundamentals of dramatic structure, story arcs, character arcs, and dialogue. Through a series of related assignments, students experiences the process of developing a script of their own and practice their hand at writing dialogue for film. Students will write at least one original pre-production script in screenplay format.

ENG 340Creative Writing Across the Arts (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course focuses on the generation of creative writing in multiple genres and media, including poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and graphic novels. Students study and practice writing in a workshop atmosphere and engage in intensive reading of excellent writings, most of which employ interdisciplinary, cross-genre approaches that encompass painting, photography, and other visual art. Discussions of readings are followed by writing experiments designed to spark original thinking, to develop facility with writing, and to enhance understanding of the creative process. Students gain in-depth knowledge of the possibilities of creative writing and apply this experience by writing both short creative pieces and longer works.

ENG 360Gender Identity in Literature (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 116 or ENG 150 or ENG 230 or ENG 242 or ENG 243 or ENG 245 or ENG 246 or ENG 250

This course introduces students to expressions and representations of gender/sexual identity in literary works, including poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, drama, and film. The course takes a historical and multicultural approach to the topic, covering key texts from the past and the present by authors from different cultures and backgrounds.

ENG 399Special Topics in English (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ENG 400Creative Writing for Game Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 150 or ENG 110

This course focuses on the narrative elements of creative writing. Exercises generate thinking and hone students’ basic storytelling talents, including characterization, exposition, plot, conflict, back-story, dialogue, and appropriate use of language. Students learn how to use symbols to design a story and how to manipulate the symbols to create character, plot, message, and interactivity. Students are encouraged to access their own genius, culture, and life experience in the development of their stories.

ENG 410Interactive Storytelling (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

In this class, students learn to design stories with symbolic language. Exercises help students apply and understand character design and development, archetypes, conflict, plot patterns, back-story, dialogue, exposition, premise, and the psychological dynamics of human choice. Students also learn how to manipulate symbols in images by drawing from a variety of theoretical models, such as Carl Jung’s dream analysis, personality profiling per Myers-Briggs, Gestalt psychology, and narrative architecture.

ENG 420Cybertexts: Interactive Media and the Future of Narrative (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 150

Video games and other forms of interactive media are widely touted as the future of both popular entertainment and narrative storytelling. If video games and other interactive media are developing into art forms, then we can expect that these emerging narrative forms will be able to accommodate genres of storytelling that have existed since time immemorial, including romance, comedy, tragedy and epic. Yet the dynamics of nonlinear storytelling, the limits of current video game technology, and the constraints of the marketplace do not seem conducive to expanding the narrative elements of interactive media. This course traces the boundaries between narratives and games, and aims to identify areas of overlap that can lead to the development of new expressions of narrativity in interactive media. One central goal of the course is to grapple with the problem(s) posed by interactive narrative. Assigned readings examine the difference between traditional narrative texts and texts that require a higher degree of interactivity, collectively called cybertexts. The goal of the course is to identify what differences may exist, and to analyze the possibilities for adapting traditional narrative into interactive media. This class’s central innovation requires students to actively adapt an element of traditional narrative into a cybertext. By the end of the class, students reach a conclusion, based on their reading and course work, as to whether cybertexts can effectively encompass traditional narrative genres, and if not, whether this is due to limitations of the form, or the limitations of technology.

ENG 440Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 245 or ENG 315 or ENG 340

This course builds upon the concepts and skills taught in previous writing courses. This course offers students the opportunity to further develop their fiction-writing skills by engaging in intensive writing and regular critique of their peers’ creative work. The emphasis is on refining narrative writing skills and developing individual style and voice. Students write three full-length short stories and read contemporary fiction by established authors not discussed in previous courses.

ENG 450Elements of Media and Game Development (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Relative to modern technological media, the most important issue to consider is the nature of the interactive loop of influence between media and culture. Interactivity is one of the most powerful and important potentials of the game medium, but the term is often used with superficial understanding of its implications. This course emphasizes the nature of interactivity primarily from psychological and sociological perspectives. Students review and define interactive media using examples drawn from academic research, film, television, and games. Students have ample opportunity to contemplate and discuss how they can apply a more comprehensive understanding of interactivity in order to surpass the current limits of interactive media products.

HIS 100Introduction to World History I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Covering a wide range of world history (Prehistoric to Middle Ages, Western and Asian Civilizations), this course provides an overview of events, civilizations, and cultures throughout time that form major historical shifts. Students analyze a series of case studies with particular focus on governments, technology, religion, and culture, and how clashes between these (and other) themes created changes in culture, power, and civilizations. Three major themes connect several topics discussed in this course with those explored in HIS 150: issues of authority and inequality within civilizations; encounters and conflicts between civilizations; and cultural and technological exchanges within and between civilizations.

HIS 150Introduction to World History II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): HIS 100

This course continues the topics covered in HIS 100, covering from approximately 1650 A.D. until present day (Renaissance to present day, Western and Asian Civilizations). Students analyze a series of case studies with particular focus on governments, technology, religion, and culture, and how clashes between these (and other) themes created changes in culture, power, and civilizations. Three major themes connect several topics discussed in this course with those explored in HIS 100: issues of authority and inequality within civilizations; encounters and conflicts between civilizations; and cultural and technological exchanges within and between civilizations.

JPN 101Introduction to Japanese I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is designed for students with little or no background in Japanese. The course presents the basics of pronunciation, orthography, speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and the sociolinguistics of modern Japanese. This course emphasizes acquiring the ability to communicate and function accurately and appropriately in both speaking and writing Japanese.

JPN 102Japanese II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): JPN 101

This course is designed for students who have taken JPN 101. The pace of JPN 102 is slightly faster than JPN 101. JPN 102 emphasizes acquiring the ability to communicate and function in Japanese accurately and appropriately, both in speech and in writing. By the end of the course, students are able to speak, understand, read, and write Japanese on a limited variety of topics.

LAW 115Introduction to Intellectual Property and Contracts (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The animation and computer software industries are founded upon the principle of intellectual property. This course introduces students to the social concepts and traditions that led to the idea of intellectual property. It surveys the various international legal systems governing intellectual property, giving special consideration to Title 17 and the local statutes that govern copyrights, trademarks, and patents in the United States. Students learn fundamental issues surrounding this field, such as fair use, international relations, and economics. The course also introduces students to a basic overview of contracts, including structure, traditions, and vocabulary.

PHL 150Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

This course introduces some of the basic philosophical issues and questions related to everyday life. Topics include human nature (self, mind, consciousness, and freedom), values (ethics, morality, and aesthetics), knowledge (reasoning, rationality, and truth), philosophy of science (universe and origins of life), philosophical positions (naturalism, idealism, realism, pragmatism, and existentialism), and philosophy of religion (god(s) and religion). Students apply these concepts to the philosophical issues related to games and video games, specifically definitional issues, philosophical themes in games, and art in games, among others.

PHL 399Special Topics in Philosophy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

PSY 101Introduction to Psychology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces major topics in psychology, specifically as they relate to cognition and learning. These topics include perception, cognition, personality and social psychology, and biological aspects of behavior. Students are also introduced to human information processing, memory, problem solving, attention, perception, and imagery. Other topics covered may include mental representation and transformation, language processing, and concept formation.

PSY 201Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101

This course emphasizes emergent research on the theory and dynamics of consciousness and the cognitive unconscious. Students are exposed to recent research that has led to an unprecedented understanding of higher human cognitive processes such as creativity, learning, perception, information processing, and memory.

PSY 250Psychology of Myth (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101

This course addresses the meaning of myth from the perspective of Jungian archetypes, archetypal projections as image, the Amplification Method of dream analysis, and Campbell's mythic parallels. Carl Jung and Joseph Campbell had a radical influence of the study of myth, and their influence gererated a new understanding of human psychology.

PSY 320Psychology of Interactive Drama (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116 or PSY 201

The course explores the rhetorical patterns and psychological characteristics of dramatic architecture. The course illustrates how neural processes structure the cognitive unconscious, how this structure is related to image projection and perception, and how it contributes to the interactive learning process. Exercises are designed to help students understand the psychology related to character design and personality development, archetypes, conflict, plot patterns, back-story, dialogue, exposition, lysis, premise, and the psychological dynamics of human choice.

PSY 350Psychology of the Media (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 201

The course explores the psychology of advertising from its emergence, its relationship to the psychology of propaganda, its influence on political thought during the latter half of the 20th century, and its influence on contextual value formations and cultural reality.

PSY 399Special Topics in Psychology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

SOS 115Media and Ethics: A Social Science Perspective (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course guides students in the ethical assessment of both the processes and outcomes of social decision-making. After an introduction to basic ethical theories, students acquire an understanding of the structure of social institutions and the process through which one makes social choices. Central to the analysis is a study of ethics as a criterion for assessment of social decision-making with emphasis on the study of particular issues of social choice. The course also provides a theoretical framework within which to spot and analyze ethical issues in the media.

SOS 150Society and Technology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course draws on techniques and perspectives from the social sciences, humanities, and cultural studies to explore technology and change in the modern era. In particular, students examine how technology influences and is influenced by values and cultures in America and abroad. The course helps students recognize the range of consequences that technology in general, and information and communication technology (ICT) in particular, have when shaped and used by individuals, organizations, and society. Through readings, discussion, lectures, and written assignments, students become acquainted with current controversies related to the socio-cultural dimensions of technology in the “digital era.” While the course examines the impact of technologies—including video gaming and robotics—on the contemporary world, it also uses an historical approach to address some of the technological innovations that have most affected U.S. society in the past. The course considers how technologies are developed and sustained, and how they interact with and affect our urban culture. Specific themes likely to be addressed include technology’s impact on the private and public spheres; the body and the self in cyberspace; and the criteria used to determine a technology’s success, failure, and danger.

SOS 180Race & Gender in Twenty-First Century America (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

This course takes a close look at current debates on race, gender, and ethnicity in American society. It begins with an overview of definitions of race, gender, and ethnicity, exploring what they have meant in the past and what they mean now. Then the course examines the intersections between race, gender, and ethnicity, asking the following questions: How do race and ethnicity differ, and how are they related? What difference does race make? How are race and gender related? Where does sexual orientation fit into the discourse on gender, and how does it fit into discussions on race and ethnicity? Current debates on race, gender, and ethnicity were highlighted by the 2008 election of the first African-American president and the ever-growing prominence of women in the highest levels of American politics. Does this mean that we have entered a post-racial era? Where exactly do we stand on women and gender-related issues? What about the place of GLBT issues in the public domain? This course explores these themes and topics.

SOS 190Introduction to Popular Culture (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course surveys trends in popular culture and the debates about how those trends affect the larger culture in general. The course will focus on a variety of popular media, which can include: music, video games, movies, television, and social networking. Topics for discussion may cover: the process of invention in popular culture; the relationship between popular culture, intelligence and engagement; the nature of celebrity; the function of simulacra; changes in narrative structure; representation of race and gender, and more.

SOS 399Special Topics in Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

Department of Life Sciences

BIO 150Human Muscular, Skeletal and Kinetic Anatomy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course explores the skeletal and muscular structures of the human body. Students learn to identify skeletal and muscular forms from both live models and anatomical references. Additionally, students consider terminology, structural arrangement, and kinetic function. The course gives special emphasis to adapting this knowledge to the needs of artists and animators.

BIO 200Animal Muscular, Skeletal and Kinetic Anatomy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): BIO 150 or ART 110

This course introduces the major skeletal and muscular structures of animals. Students extrapolate their knowledge of the human form to the structure and form of a variety of animal types, specifically focusing on the impact of locomotion and feeding strategies on form. Additionally, students consider terminology, structural arrangement, and kinetic function. The course also considers standard locomotion cycles and the relationship between humans and various animals. It gives special emphasis to adapting this knowledge to the needs of artists and animators.

BIO 225Animal Motion: Sequential Limb Movement (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces the major locomotion cycles with the associated skeletal and muscular structures of animals in motion. Students compare the moving bipedal, human-like form to the structure and form of a variety of animal types. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of locomotion on form. Vocabulary, structural arrangement, and kinetic function are all considered. The course also considers standard locomotion cycles of humans and various animals. Special emphasis is given to adapting this knowledge to the needs of artists and animators.

BIO 399Special Topics in Biology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

BIOX 500Human Anatomy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course explores the skeletal and muscular structures of the human body. Topics may include: identification of bones and muscles, anatomical terminology, concepts of body mechanics, kinetic function and facial expressions. Special emphasis is placed on adapting this knowledge to the needs of artists and animators.

BIOX 550Animal Anatomy and Locomotion (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces different types of locomotion and the major skeletal and muscular structures of animals. Special emphasis is placed upon the impact of locomotion and feeding strategies upon form. Vocabulary, structural arrangement, and kinetic function are all considered. The course also considers standard locomotion cycles and the relationship between humans and various animals. Special emphasis is given to adapting this knowledge to the needs of artists and animators.

Department of Mathematics

MAT 100Precalculus with Linear Algebra and Geometry (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course presents fundamentals of college algebra and trigonometry, with an introduction to concepts in 2D geometry and linear algebra. Topics include: polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as their inverses; analytic trigonometry, trigonometric identities, the unit circle, and trigonometric functions of a real variable; introduction to linear systems, basics of linear transformations in 2D; vectors, parametric lines, dot product, and projections in 2D.

MAT 105Introductory Probability and Statistics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course presents fundamentals of probability and statistics without calculus. Topics include: data representation, population mean, variance, and standard deviation, finite probabilities, events, conditional and marginal probability, discrete random variables, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling distributions for mean and variance, estimation of means, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, inference, and chi-square tests.

MAT 120Mathematics of Music and Sound I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course explores the mathematical foundations of music and sound. Topics include: scale systems, just and tempered intervals, oscillations and trigonometry, sound waves, combinatorics and probability.

MAT 140Linear Algebra and Geometry (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for either MAT 100 or MAT 140, but not for both.

The two main themes throughout the course are vector geometry and linear transformations. Topics from vector geometry include vector arithmetic, dot product, cross product, and representations of lines and planes in three-space. Linear transformations covered include rotations, reflections, shears and projections. Students study the matrix representations of linear transformations along with their derivations. The curriculum also presents affine geometry and affine transformations along with connections to computer graphics. This course also includes a review of relevant algebra and trigonometry concepts.

MAT 150Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for MAT 150 or MAT 180, but not for both.

This course introduces the calculus of functions of a single real variable. The main topics include limits, differentiation, and integration. Limits include the graphical and intuitive computation of limits, algebraic properties of limits, and continuity of functions. Differentiation topics include techniques of differentiation, optimization, and applications to graphing. Integration includes Riemann sums, the definite integral, anti-derivatives, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

MAT 180Vector Calculus I (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 140

Credit maybe received for either MAT 150 or MAT 180, but not for both.

This course extends the standard calculus of one-variable functions to multi-variable vector-valued functions. Vector calculus is used in many branches of physics, engineering, and science, with applications that include dynamics, fluid mechanics, electromagnetism, and the study of curves and surfaces. Topics covered include limits, continuity, and differentiability of functions of several variables, partial derivatives, extrema of multi-variable functions, vector fields, gradient, divergence, curl, Laplacian, and applications.

MAT 200Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 150 or MAT 180

Credit may be received for MAT 200 or MAT 230, but not for both.

This course builds on the introduction to calculus in MAT150. Topics in integration include applications of the integral in physics and geometry and techniques of integration. The course also covers sequences and series of real numbers, power series and Taylor series, and calculus of transcendental functions. Further topics may include a basic introduction to concepts in multivariable and vector calculus.

MAT 220Mathematics of Digital Sound Processing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

Credit may be received for MAT 220 or MAT 320 but not for both.

This course explores further topics in the mathematical foundations of music and sound, with emphasis on digital signal processing. Topics include: Digital signals and sampling, spectral analysis and synthesis, discrete fourier transforms, FFT, convolution, filtering, wave equation, Bessel functions, sound synthesis and physical modeling.

MAT 225Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

This course extends the basic ideas of calculus to the context of functions of several variables and vector-valued functions. Topics include partial derivatives, tangent planes, and Lagrange multipliers. The study of curves in two- and three space focuses on curvature, torsion, and the TNB-frame. Topics in vector analysis include multiple integrals, vector fields, Green’s Theorem, the Divergence Theorem and Stokes’ Theorem. Additionally, the course may cover the basics of differential equations.

MAT 230Vector Calculus II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 180

Credit may be received for MAT 200 or MAT 230, but not for both.

This course is a continuation of MAT 180. Topics covered include differential operators on vector fields, multiple integrals, line integrals, general change of variable formulas, Jacobi matrix, surface integrals, and various applications. The course also covers the theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes.

MAT 250Linear Algebra (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

This course presents the mathematical foundations of linear algebra, which includes a review of basic matrix algebra and linear systems of equations as well as basics of linear transformations in Euclidean spaces, determinants, and the Gauss-Jordan Algorithm. The more substantial part of the course begins with abstract vector spaces and the study of linear independence and bases. Further topics may include orthogonality, change of basis, general theory of linear transformations, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Other topics may include applications to least-squares approximations and Fourier transforms, differential equations, and computer graphics.

MAT 256Introduction to Differential Equations (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

This course introduces the basic theory and applications of first and second-order linear differential equations. The course emphasizes specific techniques such as the solutions to exact and separable equations, power series solutions, special functions and the Laplace transform. Applications include RLC circuits and elementary dynamical systems, and the physics of the second order harmonic oscillator equation.

MAT 258Discrete Mathematics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

This course gives an introduction to several mathematical topics of foundational importance in the mathematical and computer sciences. Typically starting with propositional and first order logic, the course considers applications to methods of mathematical proof and reasoning. Further topics include basic set theory, number theory, enumeration, recurrence relations, mathematical induction, generating functions, and basic probability. Other topics may include graph theory, asymptotic analysis, and finite automata.

MAT 300Curves and Surfaces (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course is an introduction to parameterized polynomial curves and surfaces with a view toward applications in computer graphics. It discusses both the algebraic and constructive aspects of these topics. Algebraic aspects include vector spaces of functions, special polynomial and piecewise polynomial bases, polynomial interpolation, and polar forms. Constructive aspects include the de Casteljau algorithm and the de Boor algorithm. Other topics may include an introduction to parametric surfaces and multivariate splines.

MAT 340Probability and Statistics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, MAT 258

This course is an introduction to basic probability and statistics with an eye toward computer science and artificial intelligence. Basic topics from probability theory include sample spaces, random variables, continuous and discrete probability density functions, mean and variance, expectation, and conditional probability. Basic topics from statistics include binomial, Poisson, chi-square, and normal distributions; confidence intervals; and the Central Limit Theorem. Further topics may include fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic.

MAT 350Advanced Curves and Surfaces (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course is a continuation of MAT 300 with topics taken from the theory and applications of curves and surfaces. The course treats some of the material from MAT 300 in more detail, like the mathematical foundations for non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) curves and surfaces, knot insertion, and subdivision. Other topics may include basic differential geometry of curves and surfaces, tensor product surfaces, and multivariate splines.

MAT 351Quaternions, Interpolation and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course gives an introduction to several mathematical topics of foundational importance to abstract algebra, and in particular the algebra of quaternions. Topics covered may include: operations, groups, rings, fields, vector spaces, algebras, complex numbers, quaternions, curves over the quaternionic space, interpolation techniques, splines, octonions, and Clifford algebras.

MAT 352Wavelets (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course presents the foundations of wavelets as a method of representing and approximating functions. It discusses background material in complex linear algebra and Fourier analysis. Basic material on the discrete and continuous wavelet transforms forms the core subject matter. This includes the Haar transform, and multi-resolution analysis. Other topics may include subdivision curves and surfaces, and B-spline wavelets. Applications to computer graphics may include image editing, compression, surface reconstruction from contours, and fast methods of solving 3D simulation problems.

MAT 353Differential Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course presents an introduction to differential geometry, with emphasis on curves and surfaces in three-space. It includes background material on the differentiability of multivariable functions. Topics covered include parameterized curves and surfaces in three-space and their associated first and second fundamental forms, Gaussian curvature, the Gauss map, and an introduction to the intrinsic geometry of surfaces. Other topics may include an introduction to differentiable manifolds, Riemannian geometry, and the curvature tensor.

MAT 354Discrete and Computational Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

Topics covered in this course include convex hulls, triangulations, Art Gallery theorems, Voronoi diagrams, Delaunay graphs, Minkowski sums, path finding, arrangements, duality, and possibly randomized algorithms, time permitting. Throughout the course, students explore various data structures and algorithms. The analysis of these algorithms, focusing specifically on the mathematics that arises in their development and analysis is discussed. Although CS 330 is not a prerequisite, it is recommended.

MAT 355Graph Theory (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course provides an introduction to the basic theorems and algorithms of graph theory. Topics include graph isomorphism, connectedness, Euler tours, Hamiltonian cycles, and matrix representation. Further topics may include spanning trees, coloring algorithms, planarity algorithms, and search algorithms. Applications may include network flows, graphical enumeration, and embedding of graphs in surfaces.

MAT 356Advanced Differential Equations (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 256

This course covers the advanced theory and applications of ordinary differential equations. The first course in differential equations focused on basic prototypes, such as exact and separable equations and the second-degree harmonic oscillator equation. This course builds upon these ideas with a greater degree of generality and theory. Topics include qualitative theory, dynamical systems, calculus of variations, and applications to classical mechanics. Further topics may include chaotic systems and cellular automata. With this overview, students will be prepared to study the specific applications of differential equations to the modeling of problems in physics, engineering, and computer science.

MAT 357Numerical Analysis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course covers the numerical techniques arising in many areas of computer science and applied mathematics. Such techniques provide essential tools for obtaining approximate solutions to non-linear equations arising from the construction of mathematical models of real-world phenomena. Topics of study include root finding, interpolation, approximation of functions, cubic splines, integration, and differential equations. Further topics may include stability, iterative methods for solving systems of equations, eigenvalue approximation, and the fast Fourier transform.

MAT 359Computational Algebraic Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course introduces computational algebra as a tool to study the geometry of curves and surfaces in affine and projective space. The central objects of study are affine varieties and polynomial ideals, and the algebra-geometry dictionary captures relations between these two objects. The precise methods of studying polynomial ideals make use of monomial orderings, Grobner bases, and the Buchberger algorithm. Students have opportunities to program parts of these algorithms and to use software packages to illustrate key concepts. Further topics may include resultants, Zariski closure of algebraic sets, intersections of curves and surfaces, and multivariate polynomial splines.

MAT 361Introduction to Number Theory and Cryptography (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course is an introduction to elementary number theory and cryptography. Among the essential tools of number theory that are covered, are divisibility and congruence, Euler’s function, Fermat’s little theorem, Euler’s formula, the Chinese remainder theorem, powers modulo m, kth roots modulo m, primitive roots and indices, and quadratic reciprocity. These tools are then used in cryptography, where the course discusses encryption schemes, the role of prime numbers, security and factorization, the DES algorithm, public key encryption, and various other topics, as time allows.

MAT 362Fuzzy Sets and Logic (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course introduces the basic theory of fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic and explores some of their applications. Topics covered include classical sets and their operations, fuzzy sets and their operations, membership functions, fuzzy relations, fuzzification/ defuzzification, classical logic, multi-valued logic, fuzzy logic, fuzzy reasoning, fuzzy arithmetic, classical groups, and fuzz groups. Students will also explore a number of applications, including approximate reasoning, fuzzy control, fuzzy behavior, and interaction in computer games.

MAT 363Partial Differential Equations and Fluid Dynamics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 220 or MAT 250 or MAT 256, MAT 200

This course explores partial differential equations (PDEs) and fluid dynamics. Topics covered in this class include Fourier series, Fourier transforms, classification of PDEs, Poisson's equation, heat equation, wave equation, and introductory topics of fluid dynamics. Solution methods of initial and boundary value problems of various types will be investigated. Numerical methods, such as finite difference, finite volume, and finite element will be studied.

MAT 364Combinatorial Game Theory (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 258

Combinatorial Game Theory studies finite, two-player games in which there are no ties. Techniques from logic combinatorics and set theory are used to prove various properties of such games. Typical games include Domineering, Hackenbush, and Nim. The analysis of such games can also be used to study other more complex games like Dots and Boxes, and Go. Topics covered in this course include Conway’s theory of numbers as games, impartial and partizan games, winning strategies, outcome classes and algebra of games.

MAT 365Introduction to Topology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course introduces topology and its applications. Topics covered include topological spaces, quotient and product spaces, metric and normed spaces, connectedness, compactness, and separation axioms. Further topics may include basic algebraic topology, fixed point theorems, theory of knots, and applications to kinematics, game theory, and computer graphics.

MAT 399Special Topics in Mathematics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Requirement: Permission of instructor

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

MAT 450Abstract Algebra I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course provides an introduction to the foundations of abstract algebra. The fundamental objects of study are groups, rings, and fields. The student builds on previous courses in algebra, particularly linear algebra, with an even greater emphasis here on proofs. The study of groups is an ideal starting point, with few axioms but a rich landscape of examples and theorems, including matrix groups, homomorphism theorems, group actions, symmetry, and quotient groups. This course extends these ideas to the study of rings and fields. Topics in ring theory include polynomial rings and ideals in rings. The course also covers fields, their construction from rings, finite fields, basic theory of equations, and Galois theory.

MAT 460Abstract Algebra II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 400

This course builds on the foundations established in MAT 450. It extends the fundamental objects of groups, rings, and fields to include modules over rings and algebras. The course gives the basic ideas of linear algebra a more rigorous treatment and extends scalars to elements in a commutative ring. In this context, students study the general theory of vector spaces and similarity of transformations. The curriculum also discusses non-commutative algebras and rings, emphasizing examples, such as quaternion algebras. Further topics may include non-associative rings and algebras, Galois theory, exact sequences, and homology.

MAT 500Curves and Surfaces (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is an introduction to parameterized polynomial curves and surfaces with a view toward applications in computer graphics. It discusses both the algebraic and constructive aspects of these topics. Algebraic aspects include vector spaces of functions, special polynomial and piecewise polynomial bases, polynomial interpolation, and polar forms. Constructive aspects include the de Casteljau algorithm and the de Boor algorithm. Other topics may include an introduction to parametric surfaces and multivariate splines.

MAT 550Advanced Curves and Surfaces (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course is a continuation of MAT 300 with topics taken from the theory and applications of curves and surfaces. The course treats some of the material from MAT 300 in more detail, like the mathematical foundations for non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) curves and surfaces, knot insertion, and subdivision. Other topics may include basic differential geometry of curves and surfaces, tensor product surfaces, and multivariate splines.

MAT 551Quaternions, Interpolation, and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 500

This course gives an introduction to several mathematical topics of foundational importance to abstract algebra, and in particular the algebra of quaternions. Topics covered may include: operations, groups, rings, fields, vector spaces, algebras, complex numbers, quaternions, curves over the quaternionic space, interpolation techniques, splines, octonions, and Clifford algebras.

MAT 552Wavelets (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course presents the foundations of wavelets as a method of representing and approximating functions. It discusses background material in complex linear algebra and Fourier analysis. Basic material on the discrete and continuous wavelet transforms forms the core subject matter. This includes the Haar transform, and multi-resolution analysis. Other topics may include subdivision curves and surfaces, and B-spline wavelets. Applications to computer graphics may include image editing, compression, surface reconstruction from contours, and fast methods of solving 3D simulation problems.

MAT 553Differential Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 500

This course presents an introduction to differential geometry, with emphasis on curves and surfaces in three-space. It includes background material on the differentiability of multivariable functions. Topics covered include parameterized curves and surfaces in three-space and their associated first and second fundamental forms, Gaussian curvature, the Gauss map, and an introduction to the intrinsic geometry of surfaces. Other topics may include an introduction to differentiable manifolds, Riemannian geometry, and the curvature tensor.

MAT 554Discrete and Computational Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Topics covered in this course include convex hulls, triangulations, Art Gallery theorems, Voronoi diagrams, Delaunay graphs, Minkowski sums, path finding, arrangements, duality, and possibly randomized algorithms, time permitting. Throughout the course, students explore various data structures and algorithms. The analysis of these algorithms, focusing specifically on the mathematics that arises in their development and analysis is discussed. Although CS 330 is not a prerequisite, it is recommended.

MAT 555Graph Theory (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course provides an introduction to the basic theorems and algorithms of graph theory. Topics include graph isomorphism, connectedness, Euler tours, Hamiltonian cycles, and matrix representation. Further topics may include spanning trees, coloring algorithms, planarity algorithms, and search algorithms. Applications may include network flows, graphical enumeration, and embedding of graphs in surfaces.

MAT 556Advanced Differential Equations (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 256

This course covers the advanced theory and applications of ordinary differential equations. The first course in differential equations focused on basic prototypes, such as exact and separable equations and the second-degree harmonic oscillator equation. This course builds upon these ideas with a greater degree of generality and theory. Topics include qualitative theory, dynamical systems, calculus of variations, and applications to classical mechanics. Further topics may include chaotic systems and cellular automata. With this overview, students will be prepared to study the specific applications of differential equations to the modeling of problems in physics, engineering, and computer science.

MAT 557Numerical Analysis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course covers the numerical techniques arising in many areas of computer science and applied mathematics. Such techniques provide essential tools for obtaining approximate solutions to non-linear equations arising from the construction of mathematical models of real-world phenomena. Topics of study include root finding, interpolation, approximation of functions, cubic splines, integration, and differential equations. Further topics may include stability, iterative methods for solving systems of equations, eigenvalue approximation, and the fast Fourier transform.

MAT 559Computational Algebraic Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300 or MAT 500

This course introduces computational algebra as a tool to study the geometry of curves and surfaces in affine and projective space. The central objects of study are affine varieties and polynomial ideals, and the algebra-geometry dictionary captures relations between these two objects. The precise methods of studying polynomial ideals make use of monomial orderings, Grobner bases, and the Buchberger algorithm. Students have opportunities to program parts of these algorithms and to use software packages to illustrate key concepts. Further topics may include resultants, Zariski closure of algebraic sets, intersections of curves and surfaces, and multivariate polynomial splines.

MAT 561Introduction to Number Theory and Cryptography (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course is an introduction to elementary number theory and cryptography. Among the essential tools of number theory that are covered are divisibility and congruence, Euler’s function, Fermat’s little theorem, Euler’s formula, the Chinese remainder theorem, powers modulo m, kth roots modulo m, primitive roots and indices, and quadratic reciprocity. These tools are then used in cryptography, where the course discusses encryption schemes, the role of prime numbers, security and factorization, the DES algorithm, public key encryption, and various other topics, as time allows.

MAT 562Fuzzy Sets and Logic (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course introduces the basic theory of fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic and explores some of their applications. Topics covered include classical sets and their operations, fuzzy sets and their operations, membership functions, fuzzy relations, fuzzification/ defuzzification, classical logic, multi-valued logic, fuzzy logic, fuzzy reasoning, fuzzy arithmetic, classical groups, and fuzz groups. Students will also explore a number of applications, including approximate reasoning, fuzzy control, fuzzy behavior, and interaction in computer games.

MAT 564Combinatorial Game Theory (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 258

Combinatorial Game Theory studies finite two-player games in which there are no ties. Techniques from logic, combinatorics, and and set theory are used to prove various properties of such games. Typical games include Domineering , Hackenbush, and Nim, The analysis of such games can also be used to study other more complex games like Dots and Boxes, impartial and partisan games, winning strategies outcome classes, algebra of games.

MAT 565Introduction to Topology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course is an introduction to topology and its applications. Topics include: topological spaces, quotient and product spaces, metric and normed spaces, connectedness, compactness, and separation axioms. Further topics may include: basic algebraic topology, fixed point theorems, theory of knots, and applications to kinematics, game theory, and computer graphics.

MAT 599Special Topics in Mathematics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

Department of Music

MUS 110Private Lessons I - Instrumental or Vocal (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons on selected instruments, or voice. Topics vary.

MUS 111Private Lessons II - Instrumental or Vocal (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 110

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons on an individual instrument, or voice. Topics vary.

MUS 112Vocal Ensemble (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is a non-audition mixed chorus providing training in vocal technique and musicianship. The class performs in concert at the end of each semester.

MUS 113Vocal Ensemble (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is a non-audition mixed chorus providing training in vocal technique and musicianship. The class performs in concert at the end of each semester.

MUS 115Fundamentals of Music and Sound Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for MUS 115 or for FLM 275, but not for both.

This course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of music and sound design, and an overview of the production of music and sound for animation, film, and video games. Topics include music notation, key, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, tempo, genre and form; historical musical styles; dialog and timing; and digital audio production methods and techniques.

MUS 116Performance Ensemble (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of the instructor; audition required

This course is a performance ensemble workshop in which students study performance practice and rehearse repertory in preparation for a public concert at the end of the semester.

MUS 117Performance Ensemble (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of the instructor; audition required

This course is a performance ensemble workshop in which students study performance practice and rehearse repertory in preparation for a public concert at the end of the semester.

MUS 120Music Theory and Musicianship I (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 120L

This course offers an introduction to basic music theory and musicianship. Topics include pitch, intervals, scales, chord structure, keys, music notation, functional harmony, modes, simple analysis, sight singing, transcription, and ear training. Musical examples are drawn from various styles and periods.

MUS 120LMusic Theory and Musicianship I Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 120

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 120.

MUS 121Music Theory and Musicianship II (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 120

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 121L

This course is a continuation of MUS120, offering further studies in basic music theory and musicianship. Topics include modal and diatonic harmony, triads and inversions, modulation, four-part writing, sight-singing, transcription, and ear training.

MUS 121LMusic Theory and Musicianship II Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 120L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 121

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 121.

MUS 150Sound Design Project I (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 150L

This course provides an introduction to digital audio recording, processing, and mixing. Students are introduced to software and hardware components of the digital audio workstation, including microphones, mixers, MIDI sequencing and multitrack recording software. Further topics include fundamentals of acoustics, recording, sound synthesis, and MIDI.

MUS 150L Sound Design Project I Lab (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 150

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 150. Students will apply their knowledge and skills as sound designers and composers on one or more projects, including one game or animation project.

MUS 151 Sound Design Project II (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 150

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 151L

This course is a continuation of MUS 150, exploring in more detail the concepts and techniques of audio recording, processing and mixing. Topics include: fundamentals of acoustics, recording, sound synthesis, and the MIDI language; microphones; mixers; MIDI sequencing; multi-track recording software.

MUS 151LSound Design Project II Lab (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 150L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 151

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 151. Students will apply their knowledge and skills as sound designers and composers on one or more projects, including one game or animation project.

MUS 160American Popular Music (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 121

This course provides a survey of American Popular Music from the 19th Century to the current day. Topics may include: the interaction of European American, African American, and Latin American traditions; the influence of mass media and technology (printing, recording, radio, video, and Internet); the role of popular music as a symbol of identity (race, class, gender, generation).

MUS 210 Private Lessons III - Instrumental or Vocal (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 111

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons on an individual instrument, or voice. Topics vary.

MUS 211Private Lessons IV - Instrumental or Vocal (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 210

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons on an individual instrument, or voice. Topics vary.

MUS 212Vocal Ensemble (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is a non-audition mixed chorus providing training in vocal technique and musicianship. The class performs in concert at the end of each semester.

MUS 213Vocal Ensemble (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is a non-audition mixed chorus providing training in vocal technique and musicianship. The class performs in concert at the end of each semester.

MUS 220Music Theory and Musicianship III (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 121

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 220L

This course explores topics in music theory, analysis, and ear-training, including diatonic harmony through secondary dominants and diminished sevenths, modulations to dominant and relative keys, and analysis of musical forms including binary, ternary, sonata-allegro, and variation technique.

MUS 220LMusic Theory and Musicianship III Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 121

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 220

This lab offers students hands-on experience in musicianship, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 220.

MUS 221Music Theory and Musicianship IV (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 220

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 221L

This course is a continuation of MUS 220, offering further studies in music theory, chromatic harmony and modulation. Topics include: impressionism, atonality, set theory, serialism, and minimalism.

MUS 221LMusic Theory and Musicianship IV Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 220L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 221

This lab offers students hands-on experience in musicianship, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 221.

MUS 230 Composition I (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 121

This course introduces counterpoint as a compositional tool. Topics include: five species of counterpoint, and compositional practices of the Renaissance and Baroque eras.

MUS 231Composition II (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 230

This course continues the study of composition using polyphony and counterpoint, expanding on the principles explored in MUS 230. Topics may include: historical development polyphony and counterpoint, fugue and related forms, use of counterpoint in classical, romantic and modern music.

MUS 240Sound Design Collaborative Project I (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 150

This course consists of a collaborative sound design project with a team of students working on a video game or animation. Evaluation of the contribution may come from faculty in several departments which oversee the team project.

MUS 241Sound Design Collaborative Project II (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151

This course consists of a collaborative sound design project with a team of students working on a video game or animation. Evaluation of the contribution may come from faculty in several departments which oversee the team project.

MUS 250Sound Design Project III (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151 , MUS 151L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 250L

This course builds on MUS 151, with further exploration of the concepts and techniques of music and sound design for animation and video games. Topics include: multi-track audio recording; processing and mixing, with emphasis on MIDI sequencing; scoring; the use of virtual instruments and software synthesizers for the creation of music and soundscapes.

MUS 250LSound Design Project III Lab (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 151L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 250

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 250. Students will apply their knowledge and skills as sound designers and composers on one or more projects, which may include work on a production team to provide sound and music for game and/or animation projects.

MUS 251Sound Design Project IV (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 250

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 251L

This course is a continuation of MUS 250, exploring in more detail the concepts and techniques of sound design for animation and video games. Emphasis is placed on MIDI sequencing and scoring, and the use of virtual instruments and software synthesizers for the creation of music and soundscapes.

MUS 251LSound Design Project IV Lab (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 250L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 251

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 251. Students will apply their knowledge and skills as sound designers and composers on one or more projects, which may include work on a production team to provide sound and music for game and/or animation projects.

MUS 260 Music History and Literature I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 121

This course presents a survey of Western music from the Middle Ages through the Classical period. Representative compositions will be studied within their cultural contexts through the development of methods for analysis of musical style.

MUS 261 Music History and Literature II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 260

This course is a continuation of MUS 260, presenting a survey of Western music from the Romantic period through the 20th century and beyond. Representative compositions will be studied within their cultural contexts through further development of methods for analysis of musical style.

MUS 270Survey of Jazz (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 121

This course provides an overview of the most prominent jazz artists and literature from its early roots to the present. Additional study will include the musical elements of jazz styles within the cultural context of the times.

MUS 275 Survey of Opera (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 261

This course presents a survey of the history and development of Western Opera, including an in-depth study of a representative opera from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern eras.

MUS 280World Music (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 121

This course centers on folk, popular, and traditional musical genres, particularly those of the non-Western cultures, examining both elements of musical style and features of society that influence music.

MUS 285Music Notation and Scoring (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 121

This course examines advanced orchestral scoring functions and musical notation systems available in current software applications.

MUS 310Private Lessons V - Instrumental or Vocal (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 211

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons on an individual instrument, or voice. Topics vary.

MUS 311Private Lessons VI - Instrumental or Vocal (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 310

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons on an individual instrument, or voice. Topics vary.

MUS 315Private Lessons - Music Composition I (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 221

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons in music composition including both traditional and experimental styles. Emphasis is placed on developing an individual voice.

MUS 316Private Lessons - Music Composition II (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 315

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons in music composition including both traditional and experimental styles. Emphasis is placed on developing individual voice.

MUS 320Conducting and Instrumentation (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 221

This course explores the basics of conducting technique and instrumentation. Students will practice live conducting of small ensembles and also study the principles of conducting and instrumentation for full orchestra.

MUS 321Introduction to Orchestration (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 231

This course introduces the principles of orchestration and arranging. Examples from classical through modern times will be explored and modeled in student compositions and arrangements.

MUS 322Adaptive Music for Video Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 251

This course explores concepts and techniques for writing and producing dynamically interactive musical scores for video games. Topics include: the history of video game music, and methods for composing and prototyping adaptive musical scores.

MUS 330Advanced Composition I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 231

This course teaches the principles of creative composition through the process of composing in one’s own style. Topics include: stimulating the musical imagination, current musical languages, analysis of contemporary scores, technical exercises, techniques for starting a composition, and approaches to composing for instruments and voices.

MUS 331 Advanced Composition II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 330

This course develops the principles and techniques of creative composition presented in MUS 330, with a focus on original composition in various styles. Emphasis is on analysis and practice of compositional methods and techniques through a series of case studies, each focusing on a specific historical musical style.

MUS 332Advanced MIDI Sequencing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 251

This course explores advanced techniques in MIDI sequencing and the virtual orchestra, using current software techniques.

MUS 340Sound Design Collaborative Project III (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 250

This course consists of a collaborative sound design project with a team of students working on a video game or animation. Evaluation of the contribution may come from faculty in several departments which oversee the team project.

MUS 341Sound Design Collaborative Project IV (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 251

This course consists of a collaborative sound design project with a team of students working on a video game or animation. Evaluation of the contribution may come from faculty in several departments, which oversee the team project.

MUS 350 Sound Design Project V (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 251

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 350L

This course builds on MUS 251, with further exploration of music and sound design for animation and video games. Emphasis is placed on recording, editing, mixing and mastering for voice, acoustic and electric solo instruments, and ensembles.

MUS 350L Sound Design Project V Lab (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 251L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 350

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 350. Students will apply their knowledge and skills as sound designers and composers on one or more projects, which may include work on a production team to provide sound and music for game and/or animation projects.

MUS 351Sound Design Project VI (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 350

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 351L

This course builds on MUS 350, with further exploration of music and sound design for animation and video games. Topics include: foley recording; use of sound effects libraries; advanced editing and processing techniques for soundscape production.

MUS 351LSound Design Project VI Lab (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 350L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 351

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 351. Students will apply their knowledge and skills as sound designers and composers on one or more projects, which may include work on a production team to provide sound and music for game and/or animation projects.

MUS 360Advanced Sound Synthesis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 251

This course explores the principles and applications of oscillators, filters, amplifiers, and envelope generators found in software and hardware sound synthesizers. Topics include frequency modulation, additive synthesis, and granular synthesis.

MUS 390Sound Design Internship (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 350

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

MUS 399Special Topics in Music (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course can cover topics which are of interest to faculty and students and may vary from semester to semester.

MUS 410Private Lessons VII - Instrumental or Vocal (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 311

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons on an individual instrument, or voice. Topics vary.

MUS 411 Private Lessons VIII - Instrumental or Vocal (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 410

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons on an individual instrument, or voice. Topics vary.

MUS 415Private Lessons - Music Composition III (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 316

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course consists of private lessons in advanced music composition. Emphasis is placed on mastery of advanced techniques of composition in one particular area, such as electroacoustic music, algorithmic composition, film scoring, or adaptive music for video games.

MUS 416Private Lessons - Music Composition IV (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 415

Entrance to the BA in Music and Sound Design degree program required.

This course is a continuation of MUS 415, and consists of private lessons in advanced music composition. Emphasis is placed on production of a larger work.

MUS 420Advanced Orchestration I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 321

This course explores advanced techniques of orchestration and arrangement. Topics include: ranges and characteristics of the instruments of the orchestra; transposing instruments; exercises in scoring and notation; techniques and software for sequencing.

MUS 421 Advanced Orchestration II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 420

This course explores advanced topics in orchestration and arrangement, and applications to scoring for film and animation.

MUS 424Procedural, Algorithmic and Stochastic Music Composition (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 321

This course introduces the theory and practice of procedural, stochastic, and algorithmic musical composition, explored by means of current software toolkits.

MUS 430 Film Scoring and Synchronization (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 321

This course explores advanced topics in film scoring. Topics may include: history of films, synchronizing animation and music tempo, synching music to pictures, and copyright and publishing.

MUS 450Sound Design Project VII (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 351

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 450L

This course builds on MUS 351, with further exploration of music and sound design for animation and video games. Emphasis is placed on production of adaptive music and sound for video games.

MUS 450LSound Design Project VII Lab (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 351L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 450

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 450. Students will apply their knowledge and skills as sound designers and composers on one or more projects, which may include work on a production team to provide sound and music for game and/or animation projects.

MUS 451Sound Design Project VIII (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 450

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 451L

This course builds on MUS 450, with further exploration of music and sound design for animation and video games. Advanced topics will vary in accordance with specifications of students’ final projects.

MUS 451LSound Design Project VIII Lab (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 450L

Concurrent Course(s): MUS 451

This lab offers students hands-on experience in a project studio, applying the concepts and techniques presented in MUS 451. Students will apply their knowledge and skills as sound designers and composers on one or more projects, which may include work on a production team to provide sound and music for game and/or animation projects.

MUS 490Sound Design Internship (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MUS 350

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

Department of Physics

PHY 115Introduction to Applied Math and Physics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

We live in a world governed by physical laws. As a result we have become accustomed to objects’ motions being in accordance with these laws. This course examines the basic physics and mathematics governing natural phenomena, such as light, weight, inertia, friction, momentum, and thrust as a practical introduction to applied math and physics. Students explore geometry, trigonometry for cyclical motions, and physical equations of motion for bodies moving under the influence of forces. With these tools, students develop a broader understanding of the impact of mathematics and physics on their daily lives.

PHY 116Physics of Music and Sound (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PHY 115

This is an algebra based physics course that builds upon basic mechanics to examine the physics of music and sound, including interactions with human sensation and perception.

PHY 200Motion Dynamics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 150

This calculus-based course presents the fundamental principles of mechanics, including kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, work and energy, momentum, and rotational motion.

PHY 200LMotion Dynamics Laboratory (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): PHY 200

This course presents the concepts of PHY 200 in the laboratory. The experiments allow the student to experience the laws of basic physics involving linear motion, force, gravitation, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, collisions, rotational motion, and springs. Error analysis and data reduction techniques are taught and required in experimental reports.

PHY 250Waves, Optics and Thermodynamics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, PHY 200

This calculus-based course presents the fundamentals of fluid dynamics, oscillations, waves, geometric optics, and thermodynamics.

PHY 250LWaves, Optics and Thermodynamics Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): PHY 250

This course presents the concepts of PHY 250 in the laboratory. The experiments allow students to experience the physical laws involving oscillations, waves, sound, interference, lift, drag, heat, optics, and entropy. Extended error analysis and statistics are taught and required in experimental reports.

PHY 270Electricity and Magnetism (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PHY 250

This calculus-based course presents the basic concepts of electromagnetism, including electric fields, magnetic fields, electromagnetic forces, DC and AC circuits, and Maxwell's equations.

PHY 270LElectricity and Magnetism Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): PHY 270

This course presents the concepts of PHY 270 in the laboratory. The experiments allow students to experience the physical laws involving electric fields, electric potential, electric current, electric charge, capacitance, current, resistance, inductance, circuits, and magnetism. Error analysis and statistics are taught and required in experimental reports.

PHY 290Modern Physics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, PHY 250 or PHY 270, PHY 200

The wake of modern physics has given rise to massive technological advancements that have changed our daily lives. This course covers many of the modern issues within the field, with an emphasis placed on the problem-solving nature of physics. The class is a calculus-based scientific examination of topics from general relativity and quantum mechanics through nuclear physics, high energy physics and astrophysics.

PHY 290LModern Physics Lab (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Concurrent Course(s): PHY 290

This course presents the concepts of PHY 290 in the laboratory. The experiments allow students to experience the discoveries of the last 100 years. The Michelson-Morley interferometer, the photoelectric effect, the electron’s charge to mass ratio, the Franck-Hertz experiments, electron diffraction and the thermal band-gap. Error analysis and statistics are taught and required in experimental reports.

PHY 300Advanced Mechanics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, CS 250, MAT 250, PHY 250

This course covers the physics behind more complex mechanical interactions as well as the numerical techniques required to approximate the systems for simulations. A thorough analysis of mechanical systems through energy analysis provides the basis for the understanding of linear and rotational systems. The combination of theoretical physics and numerical methods provide students with the background for simulating physical systems with limited computational power. Topics covered include Lagrangian Dynamics, Hamilton’s Equations, dynamics of rigid bodies, motion in non-inertial reference frames, the use of the inertia tensor, collision resolution, and numerical techniques including methods of approximation.

PHY 320Acoustics I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PHY 250

This course uses fundamental physics to explore topics related to sound and vibration. The simple harmonic oscillator and the generic wave equation will be used to derive acoustic wave equations in three dimensions. Solutions to the acoustic wave equations will be explored.

PHY 321Acoustics II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PHY 320

This course uses the tools of physics to explore sound generation, propagation, and detection. Particular attention is given to methods used by humans in each of these areas.

PHY 399Special Topics in Physics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

PHY 500Advanced Physically-Based Modeling (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This class covers the topics in dynamics modeling techniques, including methods in the calculus of variations, Hamilton’s principle, Lagrangian dynamics, Hamiltonian dynamics, motion in a non-inertial reference frame, dynamics of rigid bodies (moments of inertia, inertia tensor, and stability), collision resolution (impact parameters, scattering, and restitution), and physics of continuous bodies (elasticity, deformation, stress, and strain).

PHY 599Special Topics in Physics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

PHYX 510 Physics for Animation and Modeling (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This is an algebra-based physics course that explores kinematics, Newton’s dynamics, and conservation of energy and momentum in three dimensions. Applications include particles, rigid bodies, and systems of bodies, with emphasis on topics relevant to modeling and animation.

GEN

Systems Engineering