Department of Animation and Production

ANI 101Animation Basics I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces the principles of animation through a variety of animation techniques. Topics include motion research and analysis, effective timing, spacing, volume control, stagecraft, and choreography. Weekly screenings of classic animation are held, followed by in-class critiques.

ANI 125Acting for Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

An animator’s ability to express attitude, thought, and emotiont hrough a character’s body language is a fundamental skill necessary for success. Therefore, this course focuses on presenting tools and techniques for translating thoughts and feelings into specific gestures and actions. The course introduces students to the history of acting in theater, animation, and film. Students explore the basic fundamentals and differences of acting for the stage, film, and animation. through a series of acting exercises and problems. Special emphasis is given to classical method acting.

ANI 151Animation Basics II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 101

This course explores concepts and techniques of traditional animation. Motion and posing is explored through character development, which includes the expression of personality, mood, thought, and attitude. Emphasis is placed on the refinement of drawings, subtlety of movement, and creativity.

ANI 201Stop Motion Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 151

A variety of stop-motion methods will be explored in this course. Topics include object animation, clay animation, and armature-building techniques.

ANI 3003D Character Animation I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, CG 275

This course explores 3D character animation techniques of performance, physicality, and weight using basic rigs provided by the instructor. Special attention is given to thumbnailing key poses, video research, and stagecraft.

ANI 3503D Character Animation II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 300

This 3D animation course explores acting through the medium of the human voice, including narration, expressive reading, diction, lip-synchronization techniques, and vocal refinement.

ANI 399Special Topics in Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 251

The content of this course may change each time it’s offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ANI 400Cinematic Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 350, ART 401, MUS 115

This course is a culmination of the student’s ability to use animation as a storytelling medium. It also provides an opportunity for the student to demonstrate his or her personal artistic growth. Each student works to complete a short piece of cinematic animation. Working independently or in small groups with the instructor’s approval, students may use either 2D or 3D tools.

ANI 450Advanced Animation Portfolio (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 350, CG 300, PRJ 350

This course requires students to further extend their portfolio work, principally polishing and refining elements that will align them well for current industry needs. With a generous selection of assignment opportunities to be explored, students will gain advanced instruction on more focused acting, physicality and creature animation. This course will provide students with an ideal opportunity to improve an area of their portfolio work that will better represent animated body mechanics and acting skills.

FLM 115History of Film and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course examines the more than 100-year history of film and animation. Beginning with the scientific and technical advances that made these media technologies possible, students explore every major movement and genre as well as their impact on society. The course gives students critical vocabulary required for explaining story, animation and cinematic techniques.

FLM 151Visual Language and Film Analysis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Animation is ultimately film making, and animators should learn from the many classics on how to effectively bring various film production elements together. Students review several films and study how the relationships between scripts, cameras, lighting, sets, production design, sound, acting, costumes, props, directing, and production lead to successful visual stories. They also examine the fundamental theories underlying visual storytelling. Understanding the creative processes utilized by these influential filmmakers provides insight into how students may improve their own animations.

FLM 201Cinematography (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 115

This course explores camera composition, lighting, and editing techniques through a series of cinematic projects. Topics include 2D and 3D camera moves, film and script analysis, storytelling conventions, choreography, and staging.

FLM 210Cinematography for Visual Effects (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 115

This course focuses on the technical aspects of cinematography and still photography. This includes understanding how images are captured and processed, camera functionality, computer graphics theory, and image analysis.

FLM 215Visual Effects Analysis and Process (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 151

This course explores the history of visual effects in film and how the craft has developed in terms of technology and processes. Students also examine the fundamental production pipeline for the planning and execution of visual effects.

FLM 250Digital Post-Production (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 151

The last step of any animation project involves the assembly of various production elements ranging from rendered files to sound effects. This is also the stage where the visual effects artists add the effects seen in today’s movies. This course teaches the fundamental skills these artists use in post-production. Effective editing skills are the primary outcome of the course. Students will also cover the planning, execution, and addition of special effects to animation.

FLM 350Compositing I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 201, FLM 210, FLM 215

This course introduces students to two key areas of compositing -- image preparation (e.g., rotoscoping, blue/green screen, masks, wire removal) and compositing software (layer-based, node-based). Students apply this knowledge to basic 2D compositing, as well as motion tracking and color correction.

FLM 360Compositing II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275, FLM 350

This advanced compositing course focuses on the integration of 3D elements into live action footage. Concepts covered include image stabilization, lighting, green screen setup and shooting, match moving, camera tracking, and body tracking.

FLM 399Special Topics in Film (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

INT 390Internship I (5 cr.)

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are well structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

INT 450Internship II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are well structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office. Permission of Instructor required.

PRJ 101The Basics of Production (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 101, ART 101, ART 125

This course investigates production pipelines adopted by schools and companies. Topics include career opportunities, best practices and methodologies, efficient workflows, and basic navigation of common industry software. Projects range from small individual assignments to a limited team-based project within a game engine.

PRJ 2012D Animation Production (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, ART 120, ART 130, PRJ 101

This course is the first semester of a two-semester traditional animation project. Work is completed in small teams with a special emphasis on physicality. Additional topics include research, visual development, and production pipeline management.

PRJ 202Game Art Project I (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, ART 120, ART 130, PRJ 101

This course is the first semester of a two-semester project that focuses on the creation of a simple real-time game or simulation with 2D graphics. Artists work on cross-discipline teams of three or more members. Topics include visual design, game art pipeline, essential development practices, fundamentals of team dynamics, and task prioritization methods.

PRJ 2512D Animation Production (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 201

This is a traditional animation course within the context of a two-semester project. This project builds on the cumulative skill sets acquired in ANI 101 and ANI 151, but with a focus on team dynamics, acting, visual storytelling, and the goal of completing a short animated film rather than a series of learning exercises. Building on the work completed in PRJ 201, PRJ 251 concentrates on the production and animation for the project.

PRJ 252Game Art Project I (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 201, PRJ 202

This course is the second semester of a two-semester project and focuses on the creation of a simple real-time game or simulation with 2D graphics. Topics include art polish, visual consistency, formal playtesting, game pacing, and game balance.

PRJ 300Limited-Scope 3D Production (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 251, ART 300, ART 350, CG 275, PRJ 251

In PRJ 300 students will be guided through the elements of creating a short animated piece from design through pre-production including designing and building a character as well as an environment, then planning the animation. The remainder of the production continues in PRJ350.

PRJ 3503D Animation Production (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 300, CG 300, PRJ 300

PRJ 350 picks up where PRJ 300 left off in further developing design and production skills. The course is a full-semester project where students will produce a short animated production that demonstrates their skills in design, modeling, animation, lighting and rendering.

PRJ 352Game Art Project II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 300, ART 350, CG 300, ENG 116, PRJ 300

This course is the first semester of a two-semester team production of a game. Topics include advanced art pipeline, game engine rendering, visual consistency, and advanced testing techniques.

PRJ 400Senior Cinematic Project I (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 350, ENG 116, PRJ 350

This course is the first half of a two semester sequence on the production of an innovative short film. It focuses on concept, pre-production and asset creation in a team environment. Teams include other BFA students registered in PRJ 400. Projects can be produced in 2D or 3D. Additional topics may include effective presentations, managing scope, and team dynamics

PRJ 402Game Art Project II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 352

This course is the second semester of a two-semester team production of a game. Topics include advanced art pipeline, game engine rendering, visual appeal and consistency, user interface design, animation polish, and advanced testing techniques.

PRJ 450Senior Cinematic Project II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 400 or PRJ 402 or INT 390

With the completed pre-production work for a cinematic project done, students are then guided through final rendering and post-production. Students are assisted through the challenges of commercial art direction, quality control, production deadlines, and team dynamics, as well as many technical challenges.

Department of Computer Science

CS 100Computer Environment (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides a detailed examination of the fundamental elements on which computers are based. Topics include number systems and computation, electricity and basic circuits, logic circuits, memory, computer architecture, and operating systems. Operational code and assembly languages are discussed and then implemented on a hardware platform, such as a personal computer or an autonomous vehicle.

CS 115Introduction to Scripting and Programming (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for CS 115 or for CS 120, but not for both.

This class introduces programming environments to students who are not experienced programmers. This course covers simple logic, programming flow, and the use of variables. It introduces students to the history of programming and the basic vocabulary of the programming industry. The course culminates in a series of hands-on exercises using this knowledge to solve problems. At his or her discretion, the instructor may cover special topics in programming or scripting.

CS 116Introduction to Computer Technology and Programming (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This class introduces programming environments to students who are not enrolled in a science degree program at DigiPen. The course provides students with an introductory overview of the fundamental elements on which computers are based, including basic computer hardware systems, operations, and structures. An introduction to basic programming includes simple logic, programming flow, loops, variables, and arrays. Conditionals, evaluations, and other control structures are also included. The instructor may cover special topics in programming or scripting and may focus on currently popular scripting languages in the video game industry.

CS 120High-level Programming I: The C Programming Language (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course serves as a foundation for all high-level programming courses and projects by introducing control flow through statement grouping, decision making, case selection, and procedure iteration as well as basic data types. Additionally, this course addresses the lexical convention, syntax notation, and semantics of the C programming language.

CS 170High-level Programming II: The C++ Programming Language (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120

This course introduces the C++ language with particular emphasis on its object-oriented features. Topics include stylistic and usage differences between C and C++, namespaces, function and operator overloading, classes, inheritance, templates, and fundamental STL components.

CS 175Scripting Languages (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120 or CS 116

This course covers the concepts and implementation strategies for using high-level scripting languages in game development. Students will focus on object-oriented programming, high-level English-like structure, speed of development, and ease of use. The course includes a survey of commercial languages, as well as proprietary scripting languages from industry applications. Students will examine the process of conceptualizing a syntax for a game-based scripting language and examine how such a language is compiled and interpreted by a game engine. Using the syntax they have created, they will create a number of scripts that could be used in a game. Additionally, the class will cover such relevant topics as data-driven technology, modular coding, function calls, and procedures.

CS 176Advanced Scripting (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170 or CS 175

This course presents game implementation techniques and game architecture in a scripting language environment. Students investigate concepts of game architecture, such as game-system component separation and game flow while learning about essential elements such as the game state manager, input/output handler, and frame rate controller. Students learn how to create several different types of classic games in a variety of scripting languages most commonly used for professional games, learning the specific syntax and approaches of each language in the process. As part of their implementation, students learn how to use the specific graphics, audio interface, physics and math APIs found in the scripting environments used. Students survey concepts in space partitioning, particle systems, map editors and other elements so that they are capable of creating working prototypes of 2D games.

CS 180Operating Systems I: Man-Machine Interface (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 100, CS 170

This course presents an overview of modern operating systems as implemented on personal computers. It presents an overview of what an operating system is and does, with emphasis on the following topics: organization and design, process management, threading, interprocess communication, process synchronization, and memory management.

CS 185C++ for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 176

Credit may be received for CS 170 or CS 185, but not for both.

This course introduces the C++ language with particular emphasis on its object-oriented features. Topics covered include differences between scripting languages and C++, data types, namespaces, classes, inheritance, polymorphism, templates, and fundamental STL components.

CS 200Computer Graphics I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170, MAT 140

This course presents fundamental mathematical elements, data structures, and algorithms useful for animating and viewing 2D primitives. The course aims to fulfill two objectives. The first objective is to provide students with a sufficient mathematical and algorithmic background to design and implement 2D graphics applications. The second objective is to prepare students with the knowledge required for writing 3D graphics applications. The first half of the course deals with scan-conversion algorithms for rasterizing 2D primitives such as lines, circles, ellipses, triangles, and arbitrary polygons. The second half of the course is concerned with the viewing and animation of these 2D primitives. The course covers topics such as interpolation techniques, transformations, culling, clipping, animation techniques, and the 2D viewing pipeline.

CS 211Introduction to Databases (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170

This course provides a broad overview of database systems. It presents the fundamentals, practices, and applications of computer databases. Topics include database architectures, data modeling, design schemes, transaction processing, and database implementation.

CS 212Advanced Databases (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 211

This course will cover advanced database topics with particular emphasis on the large-scale database systems used by modern applications. Data mining and data warehousing will be explored with emphasis on search and analysis. Non-relational databases will also be covered in detail.

CS 225Advanced C/C++ (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170

This course builds on the foundation created in the first two high-level programming courses (CS 120/170). It presents advanced topics of the C/C++ programming language in greater detail. Such topics include advanced pointer manipulation, utilizing multi-dimensional arrays, complex declarations, and standard library functions. Advanced C++ topics include class and function templates, operator overloading, multiple inheritance, runtime type information, the standard template library, and performance issues.

CS 230Game Implementation Techniques (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120

Concurrent Course(s): CS 170

This presents game implementation techniques and engine architecture. Students investigate foundational concepts of game architecture, such as game-system component separation and game flow, while learning about essential elements such as the game state manager, input/ output handler, and frame rate controller. CS 230 introduces Windows programming, state machines, and collision detection algorithms, which students will integrate into their own remakes of classic games. As part of their implementation, students create and expand their own collision, vector, and matrix libraries, enabling them to incorporate basic physics engines. Students survey concepts in space partitioning, particle systems, map editors, and other elements as a bridge to more advanced concepts in implementation techniques and engine architecture.

CS 245Introduction to Interactive Sound Synthesis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 140 or MAT 100, CS 170, CS 180, PHY 200

This course explores dynamic sound synthesis, 3D-directional auditory effects, and sonic ambience to real-time simulations and video games. The subjects include mixing audio and modulating dry recorded sounds using wave table synthesis. Students learn how to create collision sounds using additive synthesis, wind effects using subtractive synthesis, natural sounds using granular synthesis and physical modeling, ambiences using layering and spectral filtering, 3D spatialized surround sound panning, inter-aural time difference, inter-aural intensity difference, and Head Related Transforms (HRTFS). Students also study algorithms and techniques for real-time multi-threaded programming and synthesized sound integration for game engines.

CS 246Advanced Sound Synthesis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 245

This course covers the basic building blocks that go into making a sound engine. Topics may include: audio file formats, sound card architecture, low level sound APIs, high level sound APIs, streaming audio, mixing, digital filters and effects, 3D audio, audio spectra and the Fast Fourier Transform.

CS 250Computer Graphics II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 200

This course examines the mathematical elements and algorithms used in the design and development of real-time 3D computer graphics applications, such as games, cockpit simulators, and architectural walk-throughs. 3D computer graphics involve drawing pictures of 3D objects, usually on a 2D screen. This process of generating a 2D image of a 3D graphics application can be described as a series of distinct operations performed on a set of input data. Each operation generates results for the successive one. This process is called the graphics rendering pipeline, and it is the core of real-time computer graphics. The graphics pipeline can be conceptualized as consisting of three stages: application, transformation, and rasterization. The course begins by introducing the 3D graphics pipeline. The application stage is examined from the viewpoint of the representation, modeling, and animation of 3D objects. Topics include user interaction, camera animation techniques, simulation of dynamic objects, and collision detection techniques. Next, the course examines the process of mapping 3D graphic objects from model-space to viewport coordinates. The transformation stage implements this process. Finally, the conversion of a geometric primitive in viewport coordinates into a 2D image is studied. The rasterization stage implements this final process.

CS 251Introduction to Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170

This course provides a high-level overview of 3D computer graphics. It is intended for game designers and artists to enable them to understand the fundamental components of graphics engine and their applications in real-time simulation and video game software. Course topics include graphics pipeline architecture, 3D transformation operations, viewing and projection, lighting and shading models, surface detail techniques, shadow algorithms, hidden object culling and removal techniques, 3D object modeling, and animation and physically-based motion control. The popular graphics programming languages (GDI plus, OpenGL, DirectX) and shader programming are also discussed in the course.

CS 260Computer Networks I: Interprocess Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 180, CS 225

This course introduces the hierarchical network communication in a distributed computing environment. Course topics cover network technologies, architecture, and protocols. The curriculum gives specific emphasis to the TCP/IP stack and in making students familiar with writing portable socket based software. It prepares students for programming multi-player games in later semesters.

CS 261Computer Networks II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 260

This class extends the TCP/IP protocols studied in CS 260 to wireless devices. This course goes further in depth into some topics covered in the introductory networks course, as well as additional subjects of interest. Topics include TCP/IP related protocols, (such as NAT, WAP, and DNS), physical media access, (such as aloha, OFDM, and WIDEBAND), wireless standards and protocols and network security. The curriculum covers additional topics based on the state of the industry.

CS 280Data Structures (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225

This course introduces the classical abstract data types (ADT) in computer science. ADTs provide the hierarchical views of data organization used in programming. Among the topics covered are the algorithms and primitives of the data structures for arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables, and graphs. In addition, the course provides an introduction to algorithm complexity and notation.

CS 300Advanced Computer Graphics I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250

This course introduces students to algorithms that are essential to creating photorealistic images in interactive simulations. Topics covered include an overview of modern GPU (graphics processor unit) architecture and the common graphics APIs used, including OpenGL and DirectX. Rendering techniques covered include texturing, illumination models, transparency, shading algorithms, mapping techniques (bump mapping, environment/reflection mapping, etc.), and shadows. Students learn how to implement all algorithms by using vertex and pixel shaders.

CS 315Low-level Programming (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 100, CS 225

This course introduces modern microprocessor architectures. Topic areas include computer architecture, modern assembly languages, and writing assembly-language programs. Emphasis is placed on using assembly language to optimize high-level language programs.

CS 325User Interface and User Experience Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280

This course presents fundamental topics in the field of human-computer interface design. Topics covered in the course will help students understand human capabilities, design principles, prototyping techniques and evaluation methods for human-computer interfaces, with special emphasis on natural user interfaces. The course will guide the students towards an implementation of a novel user interaction.

CS 330 Algorithm Analysis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, CS 225, CS 280

This course provides students with an introduction to the analysis of algorithms, specifically proving their correctness and making a statement about their efficency. Topic for discussion may include loop invariants, strong mathematical induction and recursion, asymptotic notation, recurrence relations, and generating functions. Students examine examples of algorithm analysis from searching and sorting algorithms.

CS 350Advanced Computer Graphics II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 300

This course deals with the efficient representation and processing of complex 3D scenes in order to avoid bottlenecks in the use of the CPU and the GPU. Specific topics include a variety of spatial data structures (binary space-partitioning trees, octrees, kd-trees, and grid data structures), several object-culling methods (occlusion, viewport, and portal), and finally the construction and uses of bouding volumes and their hierarchies for collision detection and related geometric operations.

CS 355Parallel Programming (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 330

This course presents an introduction to multi-threaded and distributed programming. The course covers some classical problems and synchronization mechanisms, as well as modern libraries that support parallel programming. The course also covers distributed programming models and applications to video-game programming.

CS 365Software Engineering (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225

This course covers a wide range of topics in software engineering from the practical standpoint. It encompasses project management issues as well as technical development principles and methods. Topics include system architecture, security, methodologies and notation, UML, object oriented analysis and design, requirements analysis, implementation, verification, validation, maintenance, and software engineering standards. Risk management and iterative design receive special emphasis. Student teams apply acquired knowledge to a substantial project.

CS 370Computer Imaging (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280

This course introduces image-processing methods and applications relevant to the development of real-time interactive simulations. The course covers fundamental concepts in image representation, image filtering, frequency domain processing, and image-based rendering methods. Topics include image serialization, 2D filtering, Fourier transforms, noise modeling, and high dynamic-range imaging.

CS 375Compilers and Interpreters (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 330, MAT 258

This course presents fundamental topics in the field of compiler construction. Topics covered in the course will help students understand and implement a compiler for a high-level programming language. The course will guide the students towards an in-depth understanding of compilation techniques and runtime implementation for a modern programming language.

CS 380Artificial Intelligence for Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280

This course introduces students to a wide range of concepts and practical algorithms that are commonly used to solve game AI problems. Case studies from real games are used to illustrate the concepts. Students have a chance to work with and implement core game AI algorithms. Topics covered includes the game AI programmer mindset, AI architecture (state machines, rule-based systems, goal-based systems, trigger systems, smart terrain, scripting, message passing, and debugging AI), movement, pathfinding, emergent behavior, agent awareness, agent cooperation, terrain analysis, planning, and learning/adaptation.

CS 381Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 330, MAT 258

This course covers fundamental areas of Artificial Intelligence, including various search algorithms, game playing, constraint satisfaction problems, propositional and first-order logic, and planning. The course will also explore practical skills relevant to implementation of AI techniques, practices, and design solutions.

CS 385Machine Learning (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 381

This course introduces a wide range of machine learning techniques. The topics include early machine learning algorithms like genetic algorithms, classifier systems, neural network, and various clustering algorithms. Then the course explores probabilistic algorithms like Bayesian networks, hidden Markov models, and Monte Carlo methods.

CS 388Introduction to Portable Game System Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250, GAM 250

This course introduces students to portable game systems programming and development, which is different from PC programming and development due to the embedded structure of the machine. Students work with a very limited amount of memory and CPU power. To overcome the system’s memory limitations, several graphics techniques are used, such as tile based game objects and backgrounds using color palettes. As for the CPU limitations, fixed point decimal is used instead of float numbers, along with asynchronous operations. Several portable game system specific topics, such as managing multiple graphics engines simultaneously and handling the touch pad are discussed.

CS 391Code Analysis and Optimization (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 280, CS 315

This course focuses on understanding the details for the computer, complier, and language, specifically how to apply these towards practical problem of solving crashes and performance issues. The emphasis is not only on knowing what and why, but also about taking that knowledge and creating useful tools and techniques for solving these programs.

CS 399Special Topics in Computer Science (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

CS 420Graphics File Format and Data Compression Techniques (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250, CS 280

This course covers data compression techniques for still images and multimedia. Students learn the theory behind data compression and how it is used in specific formats. Methods covered include run-length encoding, Huffman coding, dictionary compression, transforms, and wavelet methods. Students learn these techniques by examining various popular graphic file formats such as BMP, JPEG, DXTn, and MPEG.

CS 460Advanced Animation and Modeling (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 130, CS 300, MAT 300

3D animation and modeling play significant roles in computer simulation and video game software. Game developers need to have a comprehensive understanding of these techniques. This course introduces algorithms for specifying and generating motion for graphical objects. It addresses practical issues, surveys accessible techniques, and provides straightforward implementations for controlling 3D moving entities with different characteristics. The class covers two broad categories. Students will first learn an interpolation-based technique, which allows programmers to fill in the details of the motion or shape once the animator specifies certain basic information, such as key frames, paths, coordinate grids, or destination geometry. Then they learn a behavior-based technique, which generates motion that satisfies a set of rules, such as kinematics, physics, or other constraints.

Department of Digital Arts

CG 1022D Raster Graphics for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 102 or ART 105

This course introduces the software and basic interface customization options and strategies in 2D raster graphics. Interface organization strategies, system components, bit depth, resolution, memory management, and output strategies are covered. The course also explores techniques and critical thinking skills for digital painting.

CG 125Introduction to 3D Production for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 102 or ART 105

This course introduces the software and production process behind creating 3D digital art. The course covers interface organization options and strategies in 3D graphics, equipment options, and production elements. It also introduces techniques for texture mapping, modeling, rigging, lighting, cameras, and animation. The course culminates in a series of applied problems in 3D production techniques and their solutions.

CG 1303D Computer Animation Production I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces students to the basic theories and techniques of 3D computer animation. The curriculum emphasizes standard 3D modeling techniques, including polygonal and spline modeling, texture map creation and application, keyframing, and animating through forward kinematics and inverse kinematics.

CG 201Introduction to 2D Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, ART 120, ART 130

This course introduces 2D computer graphics software and practices for digital painting and production. Topics include transition from traditional to digital art, photo editing and manipulation, material studies, critical thinking skills and techniques, conceptualization, and illustration.

CG 225Introduction to 3D Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 101, ART 120, ART 130

This course introduces students to 3D software and practices for production. Topics include organization strategies, modeling, unwrapping, texture mapping, rigging, lighting, and cameras.

CG 2512D Vector Graphics and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 201

This course examines the principles and practices of 2D vector graphics and animation. It introduces students to industry standard software, output options, and production strategies for using vector graphics in both graphic design and animation. The course gives special consideration to critical thinking and refinement strategies when modifying vector images. Students examine methods of using vector-based tools for creating web and broadcast animation, and the course concludes with a series of applied problems in 2D vector animation.

CG 275Introduction to 3D Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, CG 225

This course explores and exercises the concepts and techniques of 3D animation through a series of assignments applied to characters. The course emphasizes character development in the expression of personality, mood, thought, and attitude through motion and posing.

CG 3003D Environment and Level Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course introduces students to the principles of 3D environment design. Theatrical sets, architectural simulations, and level design are considered. In order to provide students with a broader skill set, this course also presents the “mechanics” of how to use other 3D animation software, with an emphasis on the unique strengths of the package. Students explore the comparative strengths of different software packages and the impact that this has on workflow. The course emphasizes critical thinking skills and strategies for tool selection.

CG 3013D Environment Design for Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 310, CG 102, CG 125

This course provides game design students with an understanding of the design and production process of environments for 3D games. It introduces the principles of 3D environment creation and provides a functional working knowledge of modeling, texturing and lighting skills within the framework of a 3D modeling package to create believable and well designed environments. Student work is implemented into a game engine.

CG 303Hard Surface Modeling and Texturing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

Building on the knowledge and skills for modeling taught in CG 275, this course focuses on the process for optimized modeling and texturing of non-organic scene elements including architecture, props, and vehicles. Students are also introduced to digital sculpting for hard surface models.

CG 305Digital Sculpture (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course introduces an array of digital modeling, sculpting, and painting techniques with a set of industry standard 3D and 2D tools. After a series of exercises, students learn the tools and work flow of digital sculpting and enhance their knowledge of anatomy. As part of this class, students create a highly finished 3D character that is fully designed, modeled, posted, sculpted and textured. They also demonstrate knowledge of environmental sculpting.

CG 310Game Team Art Production I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course consists of the production of art for a game team. Students devise a production schedule at the beginning of the course. Evaluation of the art production comes from a faculty member who oversees the production milestones.

CG 311Game Team Art Production II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 310

This course is a continuation of CG 310, consisting of the production of art for a game team. Students devise a production schedule at the beginning of the course. Evaluation of the art production comes from a faculty member who oversees the production milestones.

CG 315Texturing for 3D (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 201, CG 275

This class focuses on how to generate efficient and accurate texture maps. Students explore techniques for generating landscape, architectural, objects, and character based textures. Topics include: clamped textures, tileable textures, advanced methods for generating normal maps, z-depth, displacement, and emissive type textures. Students will explore UV mapping, unwrapping, multi-layered shaders, animated texturing methods, use of photo reference, manipulation, compositing and other techniques to create complex textures.

CG 330Hair and Cloth Simulation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This course focuses on concepts and tools for the construction and simulation of hair and clothing models in 3D animation. Students explore techniques for generating models suitable for simulation, and the complexities inherent in simulating their behavior in the context of animation. Topics may include: evaluating and interpreting reference material, using a simulator, using parameters to control behavior, UV parameter assignment and texturing, detailing a model, fixing simulation problems, and shading and lighting as it pertains to their models.

CG 350Graphics for Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 300

This course examines the unique problems of creating graphics for games, and it teaches effective production techniques for addressing these issues.

CG 360Lighting and Rendering (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): FLM 201 or FLM 210, CG 275

CG artists must develop strong lighting skills. This course looks at the subject through the world of film cinematography and covers the process of lighting both interior and exterior virtual environments. At the technical and artistic levels, students explore rendering techniques and strategies that efficiently produce a more convincing result.

CG 375Character Rigging (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 275

This courses exposes students to rigging techniques. All students will share models and texture sets and work on learning industry best practices for professional grade character rigs.

CG 376Advanced Character Rigging (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 375

This course focuses on advanced rigging techniques. Topics may include biped rigs, quadruped rigs, and scripting.

CG 399Special Topics in Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

CG 403Advanced Environment Creation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 300, CG 303

This course focuses on the building techniques and theories behind 3D environment creation, including environment design, lighting, texturing, shading, and rendering.

CG 405Advanced Character Creation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 305

This course focuses on the building techniques and theories behind 3D biped or quadruped character creation, including anatomy, design, lighting, shading, and rendering.

CG 410Effects Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CG 360, FLM 360

This course explores the technical and creative elements required to rig and animate effects. Topics include animating particle effects, fluids, soft and rigid body dynamics. Students are required to integrate the various effects into a live action shot.

Department of Fine Arts

ART 101The Language of Drawing I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for either ART 101 or ART 102, not both.

This course explores the nature of drawing as a language skill and the use of drawing by production artists and animators. Topics include applied drawing goals, critical thinking skills, and best practices in drawing practice, drill, and play. Design principles, reference research, and the design process are applied to a series of practical problems. This course also explores drawing materials, drawing strategy, drawing sequence, and linear drawing methodology, practice, and theory.

ART 102Fundamentals of Visual Expression (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for either ART 101 or ART 102, not both.

Students will be introduced to simple drawing techniques, constructed linear perspective, visual design methodology, and drawing vocabulary through lectures, studio assignments, and simple projects.

ART 105Art Processes (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides a basic working knowledge of the processes used in making art. Topics include the origins and techniques involving drawing, tone, color, composition and artistic process as well as a simple overview of art history.

ART 110Fundamentals of Visual Communication and Design Process (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Beginning with the physiology of perception, this course explores the simple building blocks of visual communications and how the viewer understands and responds to shapes, symbols and images. The foundational skills of design process and problem solving methodologies are explored to develop the student's visual problem solving skills.

ART 115Art and Technology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides an overview of art history from Paleolithic times through the modern day. The course examines classical art materials and methods and traces the technological advances of society and art. It considers the interplay between art and technology and how they have historically impacted society.

ART 120Language of Drawing II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 101

This course introduces construction drawing as a method to create the sensation of depth and volume in art. Particular attention is paid to planar- and value-based strategies to add a convincing sense of legitimacy and consistency in 2D art and animation.

ART 125Tone, Color and Composition I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit maybe received for either ART 125 or ART 126, not both.

This course introduces various methods for activating the picture plane, manipulating the viewer’s visual experience, and visually communicating complex ideas and moods. These methods are reinforced through the study and application of light, darkness, value, color-harmony systems, and compositional strategies.

ART 126Principles of Composition and Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 101 or ART 102

Credit may be received for ART 125 or ART 126, but not for both.

This course continues to build on students' abilities to draw by exploring techniques for producing finished drawing, quick explanatory sketches, and rapid visualizations. Methods for use of tone and color to convey mood and atmosphere are covered. Basic graphic design and typography are taught with particular emphasis on interface design. Classical forms of compositional organization, such as symmetry, asymmetry, golden mean and figure ground relationships are also explored.

ART 130Tone, Color, and Composition II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125

This course builds upon the theories, techniques, and practices introduced in ART 125 while introducing the concepts of analysis and extrapolation in the creation of a visual reference library for implementation in subsequent coursework.

ART 150Human Anatomy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 101

Concurrent Course(s): ART 151

This course explores the skeletal and muscular structures of the human body. Skeletal and muscular forms are identified from both live models and anatomical references. Topics include terminology, structural arrangement, and kinetic function. The course gives special emphasis to adapting this knowledge to the needs of artists and animators.

ART 151Life Drawing I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 101

This course introduces the challenges of drawing the human form and applying lessons in anatomy to the figure. Life drawing for animation is examined in this course by studying the skeletal structure, muscle form, gesture, and emotion when drawing a live model.

ART 200Animal Anatomy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 150

This course introduces the major skeletal and muscular structures of animals. Topics include terminology, structural arrangement, and kinetic function. The course also considers standard locomotion cycles and the relationship between humans and various animals. This course gives special emphasis to adapting this knowledge to the needs of artists and animators.

ART 201Life Drawing II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125, ART 151

This course emphasizes drawing the human form from a structural perspective. Strategies for visualizing anatomy are explored. These include identifying bony landmarks and constructing the form through primitives and value. Additional topics include drawing the clothed figure and foreshortening.

ART 210Art Appreciation (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This introduction to art provides students with a better understanding of the artistic influences upon our modern culture. Along with the history of art, students study the meanings, purposes, styles, elements, and principles of art and the various media used to create works of art. In helping students gain basic awareness, knowledge, and enjoyment of the visual arts, the course provides the groundwork for further personal study in the arts. In turn, this influences the development of their creativity.

ART 2253D Design and Sculpture (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 201

This course introduces students to the principles of 3D design using both traditional and digital tools. Students become acquainted with additive, subtractive, and cast sculpture. They consider the basic concepts of architectural space, interior design, landscape design, surface interplay with light, lofted forms, and skinning systems. Students use modern polymer clays and build an animation maquette.

ART 226Gesture Drawing for Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 110 or BIO 150, ART 101, ART 151

In this class, the student is provided with significant time in front of live moving models. The main purpose of drawing moving models is to describe what the model is doing as opposed to what the form of the model is. All aspects of the drawing, including form, line, silhouette, details and most importantly, line of action, concentration on communicating visually what the model is doing and/or thinking. The course focuses on weight, depth, balance, tension, rhythm and flow.

ART 230Painting (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125

This course explores ideas and various techniques related to painting. The use of color and the representation of space is emphasized. Students explore masterworks, studio painting, and painting en plein aire. Technical and social problems related to painting are explored using portraiture, still life, and environment/landscape. A portable field easel and appropriate painting supplies will be required. The course will culminate in a group show of student projects.

ART 234Survey of Sequential Art (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 125, ART 151

In this course, students will learn to explore and to exploit the power of sequential images as a medium to craft stories beyond storyboarding, photography, and film. Through the formats of the graphic novel and related forms, students will tackle problems of character and events; their solutions will be limited only by their imaginations. The course will begin with a historical overview of sequential art and will then examine storytelling through pictures, focusing on clarity and emotional impact. Students will examine contemporary styles and conventions and will be required to draw from previous art experiences, while honing their skills in drawing, perspective, design, color, typography, writing, editing, and acting. Demonstrations of multimedia techniques and computer technology relative to this field will also be introduced.

ART 251Character Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 201, CG 201

This course introduces the traditions of character design and the basic structural strategies for creating animated characters. The course explores simplification gradients relative to human, animal, and inanimate object-based characters. It also considers issues of costume, personality, and story interaction. The course emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality. The work completed in this course may serve as pre-production design for PRJ 300, PRJ 350, or ANI 300.

ART 300Perspective, Backgrounds and Layouts (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 201, CG 201

This course explores the animation pre-production skills of background and layout art. It emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality. Students are guided through classical depth cue and perspective systems as they apply this knowledge to the creation of animation backgrounds and layouts. Additionally, students explore means of using drawing to create elements such as camera lens illusions, architectural space, theatrical sets, game visual design, matte painting, and surface texture.

ART 301Concept Art Resources (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 251, CG 201, CG 275

This course builds upon all art disciplines, primarily 2D related skills, to prepare students for positions requiring the creation of concept art. Emphasis is placed on the importance of balancing speed of content generation with quality, as this is one of the most pressing and relevant challenges in this field. With this mindset, students are challenged to evaluate and understand new forms of character and environment generation. Both theory and technique are heavily stressed during this course, with the final tangible outcome being multiple portfolio pieces that demonstrate the individual’s abilities and unique style/interests.

ART 310Architectural Spaces, Design, and Lighting I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces students to the aesthetics and principles of 2D (floor plans and elevations) and 3D environment design. A survey of architectural styles from throughout the world is blended with concepts, such as emotion, mood, lighting, shadows, aesthetics, and more. The course emphasizes learning the architectural vocabulary as well as the aesthetics of environmental and game-level design. Texturing, spatial design, negative space, dramatic lighting, and other concepts that affect not only the psychology of level design but also gameplay principles are covered. Students participate in numerous field trips to local examples of architecture in order to gain an understanding of architectural spaces and the field's vocabulary.

ART 350Storyboards (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 201, ENG 116, FLM 115

This course explores the animation pre-production skills of storyboard art. Emphasis is placed on storytelling and cinematography to create both production and presentation storyboards. Drawing is applied as a means to create story-flow, character development, mood, time, and place.

ART 360Architectural Spaces, Design, and Lighting II: Period Styles (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 310, CG 301

This class builds on the foundational skills and knowledge from Architectural Spaces, Design, and Lighting I (ART 310), covering more period styles. Additionally, students have opportunities to do more hands-on creation of art, models, and textures relative to various periods. Students participate in a variety of field trips in order to research and analyze architectural styles and then to build them in the computer lab.

ART 399Special Topics in Art (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ART 400Drawing Fundamentals (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The development of strong drawing skills is of extreme importance since they are essential tools for expressing ideas, particularly during the pre-production stages of an animation project. Therefore, this course presents the basic elements of drawing and graphic design in order to improve the student’s practical ability to draw with skill and imagination. It covers methods of observing, describing, and organizing forms using various mediums, such as pencil, charcoal, and color pencils.

ART 401Conceptual Illustration and Visual Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 300

This course explores the animation pre-production skills of conceptual illustration and visual development. Students apply their knowledge of drawing, storytelling, and composition to create speculative drawings for animation. They review compositional systems, design process, and illustration techniques. Additionally, students explore means of using drawing to visually explore story and character ideas from both existing and original story materials. They also consider adaptation, stylization, and visual variety. The course emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality. The work completed in this course serves as pre-production design for PRJ 300, PRJ 350, or ANI 300.

ART 405Matte Painting (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 401

This course takes the student through the process of designing and painting (traditionally, digitally or both) backgrounds that can be seamlessly integrated with live action footage, animation, and games.

ART 450Portfolio (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 350 or PRJ 352

This course explores elements of personal branding and professional portfolio development. Emphasis is placed on visual continuity in the creation of traditional and digital art portfolios, web sites, demo reels, and promotional items. The course also covers strategies for job interviews, contract negotiations, understanding business documents, and exhibiting at trade shows.

Department of Game Software Design and Production

DES 100Introduction to Design Process (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces the design process as it applies to interactive experiences. Topics include exploration, research, proposals, prototypes, iteration, and polishing of an interactive experience.

DES 101Principles of Interactive Design (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 101, GAT 110.

This course explores the principles of interactive design and how those principles are used to create engaging experiences. Topics include the nature of the design profession, how tension leads to engagement, complexity versus depth, and how to test interactive experiences effectively.

DES 115Introduction to Game Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 115, DES 120, GAT 210.

This course is an introduction to game design theory and the process of designing games. Topics may include design principles, writing rules, playtesting, game state, randomness, hidden information, and game balance.

DES 120Game Design Process (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 105 or MAT 340, DES 100, DES 101

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 115, DES 120, GAT 210.

This course covers the process of designing complete games through the creation of non-digital dice, card, and board games. Topics may include writing rules, playtesting, game state, randomness, hidden information, and game balance.

DES 150Introduction to User Experience (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 150, UX 101, GAT 260, ART 260.

This course explores fundamental principles of interactive design and psychological principles related to design. Emphasis is placed on information architecture, graphic design concepts, user interface documentation, and interface prototyping techniques.

DES 200Systems Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): DES 120

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 200, DES 205, GAT 211.

This course focuses on how to create interactive systems with the proper balance of complexity versus depth. Topics may include combat systems, economic systems, social systems, and system balancing.

DES 205Game Systems (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 115 or CS 116 or CS 120, DES 115

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 200, DES 205, GAT 211.

This course focuses on how to analyze and simulate game systems. Topics may include system analysis, system simulation, system balancing, combat systems, and economic systems.

DES 210Spatial Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 116 or CS 120, DES 200

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 210, DES 215, GAT 240.

This course covers the design of two-dimensional and three-dimensional spaces. Topics may include spatial archetypes, spatial affordances, map design, level design, and camera design.

DES 215Game Spaces (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 230, DES 205, MAT 140

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 210, DES 215, GAT 240.

This course covers the design of two-dimensional and three-dimensional game spaces and cameras. Topics may include spatial archetypes, spatial affordances, map design, two-dimensional level design, three-dimensional level design, two-dimensional cameras, and three-dimensional cameras.

DES 230Game Prototyping (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): DES 215

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 230, DES 301, GAT 250.

This course focuses on designing and implementing digital game prototypes. Topics may include building tension, effective feedback, teaching the player, and using interactive elements to create engagement.

DES 331Role-Playing Game Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): DES 200 or DES 205, ENG 110 or ENG 116

Credit may be received for only one of: DES 331, GAT 212.

This is a course on the design of non-digital role-playing games. Topics may include skill systems, conflict resolution, character creation, character advancement, equipment variety, world design, and adventure development.

GAM 100Project Introduction (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This class presents an overview of the way the game development industry works and a history of game development. It exposes students to the positions and job responsibilities that each member of a game development team has, along with the industry requirements for concept pitches, design documents and schedules. It also introduces sprite animation, object motion, and input processing, which students use in the creation of a game of their own design.

GAM 150Project I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 120, GAM 100

Credit may be received for either GAM 150 or GAM 152, not both.

This project focuses on the creation of a simple game or simulation. Students work together on teams of three or four members. All projects must be written entirely in C (C++ is not allowed) and cannot use external libraries or middleware of any kind (except those provided by the instructor). Topics include effective team communication, planning, documentation, debugging, source control, testing, and iterative software development techniques.

GAM 152Project I for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 100, GAT 110

Credit may be received for only one of: GAM 120, GAM 150, GAM 152.

This course introduces the workflows, methodologies, and best practices for working within a modern digital game development environment. Topics may include game editors, components, basic scripting, input processing, importing art and audio, level creation, and source control.

GAM 200Project II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 230, GAM 150, MAT 140

Credit may be received for either GAM 200 or GAM 205, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of a simple real-time game or simulation with 2D graphics (3D games are not allowed). Students work together on teams of three or four members to implement technical features, such as audio effects, music playback, pattern movement, simple artificial intelligence, same-machine multiplayer (networking is not allowed), particle systems, scrolling, and simple physics. All projects must be written with a core of C++ code and cannot use middleware such as preexisting physics engines, networking engines, etc. Additional topics may include basic software architecture, essential development practices, fundamentals of team dynamics, and task prioritization methods.

GAM 205Project II for Designers (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 175, GAM 152, MAT 100

Credit may be received for either GAM 200 or GAM 205, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of a simple real-time game or simulation with 2D graphics (3D games are not allowed). Students will either work in teams made up only of BAGD students or with students from GAM 200. BAGD-only teams can use commercial game engines, middleware, or other libraries that teams with GAM 200 students cannot. Additional topics may include basic software architecture, essential development practices, fundamentals of team dynamics, and task prioritization methods.

GAM 250Project II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225, GAM 200

Credit may be received for either GAM 250 or for GAM 255, but not for both.

In this class, students work to complete and polish the projects they began in GAM 200. Additional topics may include intermediate software architecture, advanced debugging techniques, bug tracking, formal playtesting, game pacing, and game balance.

GAM 255Project II for Designers (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 176, GAM 205

Credit may be received for either GAM 250 or GAM 255, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of a simple real-time game or simulation with 2D graphics (3D games are not allowed). Students will either work in teams made up only of BAGD students or with students from GAM 200. BAGD-only teams can use commercial game engines, middleware, or other libraries that teams with GAM 200 students cannot. Additional topics may include basic software architecture, essential development practices, fundamentals of team dynamics, and task prioritization methods.

GAM 300Project III (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 200 or CS 251, CS 260 or CS 245 or CS 365, CS 280, GAM 250, PHY 200

Credit may be received for either GAM 300 or GAM 302, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of an advanced real-time game or simulation with hardware-accelerated graphics. BSCS in RTIS students work together on teams of three to five members and implement technical features, such as networking, artificial intelligence, and physics. All projects must be written with a core of C++ code and cannot use middleware, such as pre-existing physics engines, networking engines, etc. Additional topics may include advanced software architecture, 3D art pipelines, building content tools, and advanced team dynamics.

GAM 302Project III for Designers (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 176 or CS 280, GAM 250 or GAM 255, PHY 115 or PHY 200, GAT 250

Credit may be received for either GAM 300 or GAM 302, not both.

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the design of an advanced real-time game or simulation. Students work in teams either made up only of designers or with students from GAM 300. Designer-only teams can use commercial game engines, middleware, or other libraries that teams with GAM 300 students cannot. Additional topics may include online portfolios, effective presentations, managing scope, and advanced team dynamics.

GAM 350Project III (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 300

Credit may be received for either GAM 350 or GAM 352, not both.

In this class, students work to complete the projects they began in GAM 300. Additional topics may include large project software architecture, advanced testing techniques, internships, and an introduction to resumes and interviews.

GAM 352Project III for Designers (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 302

Credit may be received for either GAM 350 or GAM 352, not both.

In this class, students work to complete the projects they began in GAM 302. Additional topics may include large project design, advanced testing techniques, internships, and an introduction to resumes and interviews.

GAM 375Advanced Project (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 350, GAM 352

In this course, individual students work to create a highly polished advanced technology demonstration or design project. With instructor approval, students could instead polish an exceptional project from a previous class to a higher standard. Topics may include advanced user interfaces and controls, advanced special effects, advanced behaviors, and creating effective demonstrations.

GAM 390Internship I (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 250 or GAT 251

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

GAM 400Project IV (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 250 or GAT 251, GAM 350 or GAM 352 or GAM 390 or GAM 490

This project is divided into two semesters and focuses on the creation of an innovative game, simulation, or demo. Students may use current software and hardware technologies with instructor approval, such as web technologies, gaming consoles, mobile devices, commercial physics engines, commercial game engines, hands-free input devices, etc. These technologies can be used to implement technical features, such as 3D animation, advanced lighting and rendering, advanced 3D physics, high-performance networking, and advanced AI algorithms. Innovation can also come from the design, visuals, and/or audio components of the project. Students work independently or in teams, as appropriate to the scope of their project. Additional topics may include advanced interviewing techniques and writing effective resumes.

GAM 450Project IV (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 400 or GAM 390 or GAM 490

In this class, students work to complete the projects they began in GAM 400. Additional topics may include working in the industry, personal networking, and career strategies.

GAM 490Internship II (5 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 250 or GAT 251

An internship is any carefully monitored work or service experience in which an individual has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on what she or he is learning throughout the experience. It is usually a professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a job situation, which places a high degree of responsibility on the student. Internships are structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.

GAT 110Game History (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course covers the history of games from the very first games of ancient civilizations, to traditional tabletop games, to classic video games from the 20th century. Topics may include how the core mechanics of even the oldest games are still present in video games today, how games can be categorized by their core mechanics, and how social forces and technology drive changes in the games we play. Students are required to play, analyze, and modify a wide variety of games as the primary coursework of this class.

GAT 120Game Analysis (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course focuses on learning the fundamental design principles of digital games through repeated examination of existing games. Students will be taught how to analyze and reverse-engineer the designs of major works in gaming history, then will analyze a variety of games themselves. Topics may include game mechanics, actions, controls, rewards, punishment, intensity curves, teaching the player, visual aesthetics, and aural aesthetics.

GAT 210Game Mechanics I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 110, GAT 120

In this course, students start building a foundational knowledge of game mechanics by creating, analyzing, and testing non-digital dice, card, and board games of their own design. Topics may include randomness, game state, hidden information, position, designing to a specification, writing rules, and playtesting.

GAT 211Game Mechanics II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 210

This course focuses on how to create the maps, characters, and combat systems needed for combat-oriented games. Students work to create a large variety of maps, create new character types for existing games, convert specific video games into tabletop games, and build a tabletop combat-oriented game of their own design. Topics may include map types and layouts, movement, visibility, force composition, character statistics and roles, melee combat, ranged combat, damage, armor and health.

GAT 212Advanced Game Mechanics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 211

This course focuses on the design of non-digital role-playing games and a variety of non-digital simulation games. Students work to create an original small role-playing game, a simulation game of their choice, and an additional non-digital game of any kind. Topics may include skill systems, character advancement, equipment variety, realistic combat, strategic simulations, supply systems, economic simulations, vehicle simulations, and sport simulations.

GAT 240Technology for Designers (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 116 or CS 120, MAT 100 or MAT 140

This course covers how to use game engine technologies effectively from a system and spatial design perspective. Topics include engine basics, special effects, lighting, controls, dynamic cameras, and behaviors.

GAT 2502D Game Design I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 116 or CS 120, GAT 211

This course focuses on designing and implementing engaging games using a 2D engine. Emphasis is on using interactive elements to deliver feelings of challenge and accomplishment.

GAT 2512D Game Design II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 211, GAT 250

This course focuses on designing and implementing some of the more complicated types of 2D games, such as role-playing games, strategy games, or economic games. Students work to create several original games in these genres, including one in the genre of their choice. Topics may include character advancement, inventory, strategic balance, diplomacy, trading, and real-time economic systems.

GAT 260User Experience Design I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for GAT 260 or ART 260, but not both.

This course explores fundamental principles of interactive design and psychological principles related to design. Emphasis is placed on information architecture, graphic design concepts, user interface documentation, and interface prototyping techniques.

GAT 261User Experience Design II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 250, GAT 260

This course explores elevating the user experience of interactive software through the intersection of visuals, audio, programming, and design. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of effective user input methods and the presentation of intuitive and engaging real-time feedback.

GAT 3153D Game Design I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 251

This course focuses on designing and implementing games using a 3D engine. Students will work to create one or more levels from start to finish, including any needed modifications to game mechanics, controls, and cameras. Topics may include aesthetics, environment building, lighting, texturing, resource placement, player guidance, player controls, camera controls, scripting, and game mechanics in 3D.

GAT 3163D Game Design II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ART 310, GAT 315

This course focuses on designing and implementing 3D games in specific genres, such as first-person shooters, adventure games, role-playing games, platformers, or real-time strategy games. Students work to create an original prototype for each genre covered using a 3D engine of the appropriate type. Topics may include puzzle design, platforming design, boss fight design, cover mechanics, and terrain modification for a 3D game.

GAT 330Interactive Narrative and Character Creation for Games (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116, GAT 251

This course focuses on how to write stories that integrate with gameplay and mechanics. From creating characters to writing branching and interactive dialogue, students work on storytelling in various genres by incorporating their stories and characters into an existing game engine. Topics may include the design and structure of dialogue trees, creating mood parameters for dialogue choices, interactive narrative, autonomous behaviors, emergent gameplay, adding emotional depth through the use of character archetypes, and weaving theme and story into the game in a way that resonates with the player.

GAT 360User Research and Testing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 210, GAT 260

This course covers a variety of user research and testing methodologies, with a strong emphasis on usability testing with a scientific approach. Additional topics include selecting research methods, selecting test candidates, focus group testing, end-user data collection, and end-user research.

GAT 370Information Visualization and Data Analysis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 360

This course covers key techniques of information visualization, the primary tool for both analyzing and presenting data. This course will cover methods for collecting and building data sets, assessing the quality of those data sets, and selecting the optimal method of visualizing the data.

GAT 399Special Topics in Game Development (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

GAT 401 Rapid Prototyping (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): CS 225 or CS 176

This course introduces students to high-level tools for rapid prototyping of creative, interactive, multimedia experiences, using current technologies for making small, portable games. The design, development, and iterative processes commonly used for developing web-based game applications and other multimedia presentations are also covered.

GAT 405Advanced Game Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAT 251

This course focuses on one or more advanced game design topics based on the expertise of the instructor. Topics may include art games, music games, social games, educational games, serious games, handheld games, alternative input games, radically innovative games, and more. Students work to create one or more prototypes of a game in the areas being covered, either individually or in teams, as appropriate. Emphasis is heavily placed on innovation and students are encouraged to challenge their assumptions about what games are and what games can be.

GAT 480Senior Portfolio (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): GAM 350 or GAM 352

This one-credit course covers advanced portfolio development. Students work to organize and present their work in online, paper, and electronic media in a professional form. Topics may include targeted resumes, non-standard cover letters, advanced interviewing techniques, interactive portfolios, and voice-over videos.

MGT 451Project Management (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides in-depth examination of theories, techniques, and issues in project management. It covers various aspects of project management including team leadership, marketing, budgeting, long-range project planning, contract negotiations, and intellectual property considerations. The course includes exercises that give students insight into dealing with product conceptualization, team effectiveness and performance issues.

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences

COL 230College Success for Artists (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PRJ 201 or PRJ 202

This course introduces industry research, professional expectations, and requisite levels of proficiency. The course helps identify strengths, skills, interests, and areas for growth and requires the creation of an academic plan.

COL 499Career Search Preparation: Materials, Logistics and Communication (1 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This is a capstone course for students to prepare their application materials and learn how to effectively search for an entry-level job in their field. The goal of the course is for each student to have a polished resume, cover letter, business card, and online/web presence by the end of the semester, as well as a search strategy for seeking employment.

COM 150Interpersonal and Work Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course provides an introduction to interpersonal and professional communication. Particular attention is paid to verbal and nonverbal communication skills, small-group communication, and conflict resolution.

COM 250Professional Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course prepares students for the communication challenges that await them in the professional world. Topics covered may include professional networking strategies, career search materials, self-presentation and interview skills, and effective communication across all levels and functions of the workplace.

COM 351Gender and Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): COM 150

This course introduces the theory and vocabulary of gender studies and relevant socio-political movements such as the women’s movement. It investigates how ideas about sex and gender and identities as men, women, and sexual beings are influenced by and manifested in communication behaviors and in the communication channels and messages that permeate society. Key themes include: the fluidity of gender, the gendered body, gender in verbal and non-verbal communication in professional and non-professional settings, and gender-based power and authority.

COM 399Special Topics in Communication (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ECN 100Introduction to Economics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces the fundamentals of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics may include supply and demand, competition, market efficiency, auctions, barter, monopolies, externalities, welfare, unemployment, growth, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates, and budget deficits.

ECN 350Engineering Economics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course gives students a sound basis for making economic decisions in business and industry environments. Students learn how to decide which projects are worthwhile, determine priorities, and select components. Topics in this course include present worth, future amounts, cash flows, salvage value, depreciation, rates of return, income tax, basic cost accounting, and funding sources, including venture capital and SBIR. The course also covers the basics of intellectual property, patents, and copyright.

ENG 110Composition (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course focuses on generating and discussing ideas for composition and engages in all stages of the writing process, with emphasis on the development and application of critical thinking skills. The primary focus of the course is developing the ability to construct, write, and revise argumentative/persuasive essays. Assignments may also include other types of writing, such as narrative, descriptive, and comparative essays.

ENG 116Storytelling (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course covers the principal elements of storytelling including theme, character, perspective, setting, plot, and dialogue. It emphasizes non-visual media such as short stories, novels, and plays, though visual media including film and video games may be discussed as well.

ENG 120Research, Reasoning, and Writing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

In this composition course, students practice advanced argumentative essay writing with a focus on research, critical analysis of the research, thesis presentation, and defense. During the semester, students write several research essays on various topics using both traditional and new information techniques.

ENG 150Mythology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course studies myths from different world cultures. It provides an in-depth discussion of the Hero’s Journey (a basic pattern that appears in many narratives) and its principal archetypes. It also studies mythology across the arts and examines how essential it is to the study of literature, drama, film and video games.

ENG 230Speculative Fiction (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course is a survey of speculative fiction (in literature, television, film, and graphic novels) that moves beyond pure realism to include fantastic or imaginative elements and to present worlds that differ significantly from our own. Each semester, the course will focus on one or more sub-genres which may include science fiction, fantasy, horror, magic realism, alternate history, steampunk, or cyberpunk.

ENG 242Multicultural Literature (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110, ENG 150

This course explores what modernity and post-modernity have or have not meant to American writers whose histories and cultures are not European in origin but whose writings are steeped in European-American literary traditions. The course explores the cultural hybridism of this literature as well the unique visions of the world they have created. These funny, humorous, bitterly satirical, and downright serious (post)- modern fantasies are quintessentially American, yet also unique and peculiar to these authors’ ethnic experiences. The selected works also offer an opportunity to read or re-read well established and newer American works of literature.

ENG 243Epic Literature (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116, ENG 150

This course provides an introduction to the epic as a genre, including poetry, drama, and novels. Particular attention is paid to the theme of heroism and its many cultural manifestations.

ENG 245Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course provides an introduction to the study and practice of fiction writing including characterization, plot, setting, and point of view. It presents selected works of short and long fiction. The course is an opportunity for students to practice their own creative writing skills. They are required to write at least two short stories.

ENG 246American Ethnic Literatures (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course covers prominent themes and techniques in American ethic literatures such as Native, African, Asian, and Hispanic American Literatures. Modern Texts are emphasized but pre- or early 20th century classics may also be included.

ENG 250The Graphic Novel (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course provides an introduction to the study of graphic novels, a unique field of inquiry encompassing many world cultures and drawing on many disciplines. Students will read, discuss, and analyze many different types of novels, such as stand-alone, serial, and adaptive books.

ENG 315Scriptwriting (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 116 or ENG 245

This course covers the fundamentals of concept development, dramatic structure, and writing for a visual medium. It leads to the completion of at least one original preproduction script in screenplay format.

ENG 340Creative Writing Across the Arts (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course focuses on the generation of creative writing in multiple genres and media, including poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and graphic novels. Students study and practice writing in a workshop atmosphere and engage in intensive reading of excellent writings, most of which employ interdisciplinary, cross-genre approaches that encompass painting, photography, and other visual art. Discussions of readings are followed by writing experiments designed to spark original thinking, to develop facility with writing, and to enhance understanding of the creative process. Students gain in-depth knowledge of the possibilities of creative writing and apply this experience by writing both short creative pieces and longer works.

ENG 360Gender Identity in Literature (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 116 or ENG 150 or ENG 230 or ENG 242 or ENG 243 or ENG 245 or ENG 246 or ENG 250

This course introduces students to expressions and representations of gender/sexual identity in literary works, including poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, drama, and film. The course takes a historical and multicultural approach to the topic, covering key texts from the past and the present by authors from different cultures and backgrounds.

ENG 399Special Topics in English (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required.

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

ENG 400Creative Writing for Game Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 150 or ENG 110

This course focuses on the narrative elements of creative writing. Exercises generate thinking and hone students’ basic storytelling talents, including characterization, exposition, plot, conflict, back-story, dialogue, and appropriate use of language. Students learn how to use symbols to design a story and how to manipulate the symbols to create character, plot, message, and interactivity. Students are encouraged to access their own genius, culture, and life experience in the development of their stories.

ENG 410Interactive Storytelling (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

In this class, students learn to design stories with symbolic language. Exercises help students apply and understand character design and development, archetypes, conflict, plot patterns, back-story, dialogue, exposition, premise, and the psychological dynamics of human choice. Students also learn how to manipulate symbols in images by drawing from a variety of theoretical models, such as Carl Jung’s dream analysis, personality profiling per Myers-Briggs, Gestalt psychology, and narrative architecture.

ENG 420Cybertexts: Interactive Media and the Future of Narrative (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 150

Video games and other forms of interactive media are widely touted as the future of both popular entertainment and narrative storytelling. If video games and other interactive media are developing into art forms, then we can expect that these emerging narrative forms will be able to accommodate genres of storytelling that have existed since time immemorial, including romance, comedy, tragedy and epic. Yet the dynamics of nonlinear storytelling, the limits of current video game technology, and the constraints of the marketplace do not seem conducive to expanding the narrative elements of interactive media. This course traces the boundaries between narratives and games, and aims to identify areas of overlap that can lead to the development of new expressions of narrativity in interactive media. One central goal of the course is to grapple with the problem(s) posed by interactive narrative. Assigned readings examine the difference between traditional narrative texts and texts that require a higher degree of interactivity, collectively called cybertexts. The goal of the course is to identify what differences may exist, and to analyze the possibilities for adapting traditional narrative into interactive media. This class’s central innovation requires students to actively adapt an element of traditional narrative into a cybertext. By the end of the class, students reach a conclusion, based on their reading and course work, as to whether cybertexts can effectively encompass traditional narrative genres, and if not, whether this is due to limitations of the form, or the limitations of technology.

ENG 440Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 245 or ENG 315 or ENG 340

This course builds upon the concepts and skills taught in previous writing courses. This course offers students the opportunity to further develop their fiction-writing skills by engaging in intensive writing and regular critique of their peers’ creative work. The emphasis is on refining narrative writing skills and developing individual style and voice. Students write three full-length short stories and read contemporary fiction by established authors not discussed in previous courses.

ENG 450Elements of Media and Game Development (2 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Relative to modern technological media, the most important issue to consider is the nature of the interactive loop of influence between media and culture. Interactivity is one of the most powerful and important potentials of the game medium, but the term is often used with superficial understanding of its implications. This course emphasizes the nature of interactivity primarily from psychological and sociological perspectives. Students review and define interactive media using examples drawn from academic research, film, television, and games. Students have ample opportunity to contemplate and discuss how they can apply a more comprehensive understanding of interactivity in order to surpass the current limits of interactive media products.

HIS 100Introduction to World History I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Covering a wide range of world history (Prehistoric to Middle Ages, Western and Asian Civilizations), this course provides an overview of events, civilizations, and cultures throughout time that form major historical shifts. Students analyze a series of case studies with particular focus on governments, technology, religion, and culture, and how clashes between these (and other) themes created changes in culture, power, and civilizations. Three major themes connect several topics discussed in this course with those explored in HIS 150: issues of authority and inequality within civilizations; encounters and conflicts between civilizations; and cultural and technological exchanges within and between civilizations.

HIS 150Introduction to World History II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): HIS 100

This course continues the topics covered in HIS 100, covering from approximately 1650 A.D. until present day (Renaissance to present day, Western and Asian Civilizations). Students analyze a series of case studies with particular focus on governments, technology, religion, and culture, and how clashes between these (and other) themes created changes in culture, power, and civilizations. Three major themes connect several topics discussed in this course with those explored in HIS 100: issues of authority and inequality within civilizations; encounters and conflicts between civilizations; and cultural and technological exchanges within and between civilizations.

JPN 101Introduction to Japanese I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is designed for students with little or no background in Japanese. The course presents the basics of pronunciation, orthography, speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and the sociolinguistics of modern Japanese. This course emphasizes acquiring the ability to communicate and function accurately and appropriately in both speaking and writing Japanese.

JPN 102Japanese II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): JPN 101

This course is designed for students who have taken JPN 101. The pace of JPN 102 is slightly faster than JPN 101. JPN 102 emphasizes acquiring the ability to communicate and function in Japanese accurately and appropriately, both in speech and in writing. By the end of the course, students are able to speak, understand, read, and write Japanese on a limited variety of topics.

LAW 115Introduction to Intellectual Property and Contracts (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The animation and computer software industries are founded upon the principle of intellectual property. This course introduces students to the social concepts and traditions that led to the idea of intellectual property. It surveys the various international legal systems governing intellectual property, giving special consideration to Title 17 and the local statutes that govern copyrights, trademarks, and patents in the United States. Students learn fundamental issues surrounding this field, such as fair use, international relations, and economics. The course also introduces students to a basic overview of contracts, including structure, traditions, and vocabulary.

MED 210Race and Ethnicity in Media (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course explores the origins and evolution of racial and ethnic images in media. It pays special attention to the process of creating new images in both traditional visual media such as film and television and newer interactive media.

MED 399Special Topics in Media (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty or students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

PHL 150Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

This course introduces some of the basic philosophical issues and questions related to everyday life. Topics include human nature (self, mind, consciousness, and freedom), values (ethics, morality, and aesthetics), knowledge (reasoning, rationality, and truth), philosophy of science (universe and origins of life), philosophical positions (naturalism, idealism, realism, pragmatism, and existentialism), and philosophy of religion (god(s) and religion). Students apply these concepts to the philosophical issues related to games and video games, specifically definitional issues, philosophical themes in games, and art in games, among others.

PHL 399Special Topics in Philosophy (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

PSY 101Introduction to Psychology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces major topics in psychology, specifically as they relate to cognition and learning. These topics include perception, cognition, personality and social psychology, and biological aspects of behavior. Students are also introduced to human information processing, memory, problem solving, attention, perception, and imagery. Other topics covered may include mental representation and transformation, language processing, and concept formation.

PSY 201Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101

This course emphasizes emergent research and theory exploring the nature of human mental processes. Topics include neuroscience, attention, perception, memory, creativity, decision making, and information processing.

PSY 209Fundamentals of Psychological Research (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101

This course introduces major topics exploring research procedures and methodology in the behavioral and social sciences. Major topics include principles of the scientific method, fundamental research concepts, terminology, critical evaluation of methodological issues, and best practices for designing psychological testing and research. Differences in qualitative and quantitative methodology, types of data collection, user experiences and design, and reporting results are also explored. Other topics include research ethics and best practices for data management and presentation.

PSY 210Social Psychology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 101

This course will provide an overview of research and theory in social psychology by focusing on concepts including mental processing, attitude formation and change, conflict and aggression, persuasion, and socio-behavioral influences.

PSY 350Psychology of the Media (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 201

The course explores the psychology of advertising from its emergence, its relationship to the psychology of propaganda, its influence on political thought during the latter half of the 20th century, and its influence on contextual value formations and cultural reality.

PSY 399Special Topics in Psychology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

SOS 115Media and Ethics: A Social Science Perspective (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course guides students in the ethical assessment of both the processes and outcomes of social decision-making. After an introduction to basic ethical theories, students acquire an understanding of the structure of social institutions and the process through which one makes social choices. Central to the analysis is a study of ethics as a criterion for assessment of social decision-making with emphasis on the study of particular issues of social choice. The course also provides a theoretical framework within which to spot and analyze ethical issues in the media.

SOS 150Society and Technology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course draws on techniques and perspectives from the social sciences, humanities, and cultural studies to explore technology and change in the modern era. In particular, students examine how technology influences and is influenced by values and cultures in America and abroad. The course helps students recognize the range of consequences that technology in general, and information and communication technology (ICT) in particular, have when shaped and used by individuals, organizations, and society. Through readings, discussion, lectures, and written assignments, students become acquainted with current controversies related to the socio-cultural dimensions of technology in the “digital era.” While the course examines the impact of technologies—including video gaming and robotics—on the contemporary world, it also uses an historical approach to address some of the technological innovations that have most affected U.S. society in the past. The course considers how technologies are developed and sustained, and how they interact with and affect our urban culture. Specific themes likely to be addressed include technology’s impact on the private and public spheres; the body and the self in cyberspace; and the criteria used to determine a technology’s success, failure, and danger.

SOS 190Introduction to Popular Culture (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116

This course surveys trends in popular culture and the debates about how those trends affect the larger culture in general. The course will focus on a variety of popular media, which can include: music, video games, movies, television, and social networking. Topics for discussion may cover: the process of invention in popular culture; the relationship between popular culture, intelligence and engagement; the nature of celebrity; the function of simulacra; changes in narrative structure; representation of race and gender, and more.

SOS 399Special Topics in Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Permission of instructor required.

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

Department of Life Sciences

BIO 225Animal Motion: Sequential Limb Movement (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course introduces the major locomotion cycles with the associated skeletal and muscular structures of animals in motion. Students compare the moving bipedal, human-like form to the structure and form of a variety of animal types. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of locomotion on form. Vocabulary, structural arrangement, and kinetic function are all considered. The course also considers standard locomotion cycles of humans and various animals. Special emphasis is given to adapting this knowledge to the needs of artists and animators.

BIO 399Special Topics in Biology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

Department of Mathematics

MAT 100Precalculus with Linear Algebra and Geometry (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course presents fundamentals of college algebra and trigonometry, with an introduction to concepts in 2D geometry and linear algebra. Topics include: polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions as well as their inverses; analytic trigonometry, trigonometric identities, the unit circle, and trigonometric functions of a real variable; introduction to linear systems, basics of linear transformations in 2D; vectors, parametric lines, dot product, and projections in 2D.

MAT 105Introductory Probability and Statistics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course presents fundamentals of probability and statistics without calculus. Topics include: data representation, population mean, variance, and standard deviation, finite probabilities, events, conditional and marginal probability, discrete random variables, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling distributions for mean and variance, estimation of means, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, inference, and chi-square tests.

MAT 140Linear Algebra and Geometry (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for either MAT 100 or MAT 140, but not for both.

The two main themes throughout the course are vector geometry and linear transformations. Topics from vector geometry include vector arithmetic, dot product, cross product, and representations of lines and planes in three-space. Linear transformations covered include rotations, reflections, shears and projections. Students study the matrix representations of linear transformations along with their derivations. The curriculum also presents affine geometry and affine transformations along with connections to computer graphics. This course also includes a review of relevant algebra and trigonometry concepts.

MAT 150Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

Credit may be received for MAT 150 or MAT 180, but not for both.

This course introduces the calculus of functions of a single real variable. The main topics include limits, differentiation, and integration. Limits include the graphical and intuitive computation of limits, algebraic properties of limits, and continuity of functions. Differentiation topics include techniques of differentiation, optimization, and applications to graphing. Integration includes Riemann sums, the definite integral, anit-derivatives, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

MAT 180Vector Calculus I (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 140

Credit maybe received for either MAT 150 or MAT 180, but not for both.

This course extends the standard calculus of one-variable functions to multi-variable vector-valued functions. Vector calculus is used in many branches of physics, engineering, and science, with applications that include dynamics, fluid mechanics, electromagnetism, and the study of curves and surfaces. Topics covered include limits, continuity, and differentiability of functions of several variables, partial derivatives, extrema of multi-variable functions, vector fields, gradient, divergence, curl, Laplacian, and applications.

MAT 200Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 150 or MAT 180

Credit may be received for MAT 200 or MAT 230, but not for both.

This course builds on the introduction to calculus in MAT150. Topics in integration include applications of the integral in physics and geometry and techniques of integration. The course also covers sequences and series of real numbers, power series and Taylor series, and calculus of transcendental functions. Further topics may include a basic introduction to concepts in multivariable and vector calculus.

MAT 220Mathematics of Digital Sound Processing (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

Credit may be received for MAT 220 or MAT 320 but not for both.

This course explores further topics in the mathematical foundations of music and sound, with emphasis on digital signal processing. Topics include: Digital signals and sampling, spectral analysis and synthesis, discrete fourier transforms, FFT, convolution, filtering, wave equation, Bessel functions, sound synthesis and physical modeling.

MAT 225Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

This course extends the basic ideas of calculus to the context of functions of several variables and vector-valued functions. Topics include partial derivatives, tangent planes, and Lagrange multipliers. The study of curves in two- and three space focuses on curvature, torsion, and the TNB-frame. Topics in vector analysis include multiple integrals, vector fields, Green’s Theorem, the Divergence Theorem and Stokes’ Theorem. Additionally, the course may cover the basics of differential equations.

MAT 230Vector Calculus II (4 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 180

Credit may be received for MAT 200 or MAT 230, but not for both.

This course is a continuation of MAT 180. Topics covered include differential operators on vector fields, multiple integrals, line integrals, general change of variable formulas, Jacobi matrix, surface integrals, and various applications. The course also covers the theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes.

MAT 250Linear Algebra (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

This course presents the mathematical foundations of linear algebra, which includes a review of basic matrix algebra and linear systems of equations as well as basics of linear transformations in Euclidean spaces, determinants, and the Gauss-Jordan Algorithm. The more substantial part of the course begins with abstract vector spaces and the study of linear independence and bases. Further topics may include orthogonality, change of basis, general theory of linear transformations, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Other topics may include applications to least-squares approximations and Fourier transforms, differential equations, and computer graphics.

MAT 256Introduction to Differential Equations (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

This course introduces the basic theory and applications of first and second-order linear differential equations. The course emphasizes specific techniques such as the solutions to exact and separable equations, power series solutions, special functions and the Laplace transform. Applications include RLC circuits and elementary dynamical systems, and the physics of the second order harmonic oscillator equation.

MAT 258Discrete Mathematics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230

This course gives an introduction to several mathematical topics of foundational importance in the mathematical and computer sciences. Typically starting with propositional and first order logic, the course considers applications to methods of mathematical proof and reasoning. Further topics include basic set theory, number theory, enumeration, recurrence relations, mathematical induction, generating functions, and basic probability. Other topics may include graph theory, asymptotic analysis, and finite automata.

MAT 300Curves and Surfaces (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course is an introduction to parameterized polynomial curves and surfaces with a view toward applications in computer graphics. It discusses both the algebraic and constructive aspects of these topics. Algebraic aspects include vector spaces of functions, special polynomial and piecewise polynomial bases, polynomial interpolation, and polar forms. Constructive aspects include the de Casteljau algorithm and the de Boor algorithm. Other topics may include an introduction to parametric surfaces and multivariate splines.

MAT 340Probability and Statistics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, MAT 258

This course is an introduction to basic probability and statistics with an eye toward computer science and artifical intelligence. Basic topics from probability theory include sample spaces, random variables, continuous and discrete probability density functions, mean and variance, expectation, and conditional probability. Basic topics from statistics include binomial, Poisson, chi-square, and normal distributions; confidence intervals; and the Central Limit Theorem. Further topics may include fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic.

MAT 345Introduction to Data Science (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 140, MAT 258

This course presents a variety of computational tools for modeling and understanding complex data. Topics include manipulating data, exploratory data analysis, statistical inference, spam filters and naïve Bayes, neural networks, and machine learning algorithms such as linear regression, k-nearest neighbors, and k-means. The course will focus on both understanding the mathematics underlying the computational methods and gaining hands-on experience in the application of these techniques to real datasets.

MAT 350Advanced Curves and Surfaces (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course is a continuation of MAT 300 with topics taken from the theory and applications of curves and surfaces. The course treats some of the material from MAT 300 in more detail, like the mathematical foundations for non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) curves and surfaces, knot insertion, and subdivision. Other topics may include basic differential geometry of curves and surfaces, tensor product surfaces, and multivariate splines.

MAT 351Quaternions, Interpolation and Animation (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course gives an introduction to several mathematical topics of foundational importance to abstract algebra, and in particular the algebra of quaternions. Topics covered may include: operations, groups, rings, fields, vector spaces, algebras, complex numbers, quaternions, curves over the quaternionic space, interpolation techniques, splines, octonions, and Clifford algebras.

MAT 352Wavelets (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course presents the foundations of wavelets as a method of representing and approximating functions. It discusses background material in complex linear algebra and Fourier analysis. Basic material on the discrete and continuous wavelet transforms forms the core subject matter. This includes the Haar transform, and multi-resolution analysis. Other topics may include subdivision curves and surfaces, and B-spline wavelets. Applications to computer graphics may include image editing, compression, surface reconstruction from contours, and fast methods of solving 3D simulation problems.

MAT 353Differential Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course presents an introduction to differential geometry, with emphasis on curves and surfaces in three-space. It includes background material on the differentiability of multivariable functions. Topics covered include parameterized curves and surfaces in three-space and their associated first and second fundamental forms, Gaussian curvature, the Gauss map, and an introduction to the intrinsic geometry of surfaces. Other topics may include an introduction to differentiable manifolds, Riemannian geometry, and the curvature tensor.

MAT 354Discrete and Computational Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

Topics covered in this course include convex hulls, triangulations, Art Gallery theorems, Voronoi diagrams, Delaunay graphs, Minkowski sums, path finding, arrangements, duality, and possibly randomized algorithms, time permitting. Throughout the course, students explore various data structures and algorithms. The analysis of these algorithms, focusing specifically on the mathematics that arises in their development and analysis is discussed. Although CS 330 is not a prerequisite, it is recommended.

MAT 355Graph Theory (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course provides an introduction to the basic theorems and algorithms of graph theory. Topics include graph isomorphism, connectedness, Euler tours, Hamiltonian cycles, and matrix representation. Further topics may include spanning trees, coloring algorithms, planarity algorithms, and search algorithms. Applications may include network flows, graphical enumeration, and embedding of graphs in surfaces.

MAT 356Advanced Differential Equations (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 256

This course covers the advanced theory and applications of ordinary differential equations. The first course in differential equations focused on basic prototypes, such as exact and separable equations and the second-degree harmonic oscillator equation. This course builds upon these ideas with a greater degree of generality and theory. Topics include qualitative theory, dynamical systems, calculus of variations, and applications to classical mechanics. Further topics may include chaotic systems and cellular automata. With this overview, students will be prepared to study the specific applications of differential equations to the modeling of problems in physics, engineering, and computer science.

MAT 357Numerical Analysis (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course covers the numerical techniques arising in many areas of computer science and applied mathematics. Such techniques provide essential tools for obtaining approximate solutions to non-linear equations arising from the construction of mathematical models of real-world phenomena. Topics of study include root finding, interpolation, approximation of functions, cubic splines, integration, and differential equations. Further topics may include stability, iterative methods for solving systems of equations, eigenvalue approximation, and the fast Fourier transform.

MAT 359Computational Algebraic Geometry (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 300

This course introduces computational algebra as a tool to study the geometry of curves and surfaces in affine and projective space. The central objects of study are affine varieties and polynomial ideals, and the algebra-geometry dictionary captures relations between these two objects. The precise methods of studying polynomial ideals make use of monomial orderings, Grobner bases, and the Buchberger algorithm. Students have opportunities to program parts of these algorithms and to use software packages to illustrate key concepts. Further topics may include resultants, Zariski closure of algebraic sets, intersections of curves and surfaces, and multivariate polynomial splines.

MAT 361Introduction to Number Theory and Cryptography (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course is an introduction to elementary number theory and cryptography. Among the essential tools of number theory that are covered, are divisibility and congruence, Euler’s function, Fermat’s little theorem, Euler’s formula, the Chinese remainder theorem, powers modulo m, kth roots modulo m, primitive roots and indices, and quadratic reciprocity. These tools are then used in cryptography, where the course discusses encryption schemes, the role of prime numbers, security and factorization, the DES algorithm, public key encryption, and various other topics, as time allows.

MAT 362Fuzzy Sets and Logic (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course introduces the basic theory of fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic and explores some of their applications. Topics covered include classical sets and their operations, fuzzy sets and their operations, membership functions, fuzzy relations, fuzzification/ defuzzification, classical logic, multi-valued logic, fuzzy logic, fuzzy reasoning, fuzzy arithmetic, classical groups, and fuzz groups. Students will also explore a number of applications, including approximate reasoning, fuzzy control, fuzzy behavior, and interaction in computer games.

MAT 364Combinatorial Game Theory (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 258

Combinatorial Game Theory studies finite, two-player games in which there are no ties. Techniques from logic combinatorics and set theory are used to prove various properties of such games. Typical games include Domineering, Hackenbush, and Nim. The analysis of such games can also be used to study other more complex games like Dots and Boxes, and Go. Topics covered in this course include Conway’s theory of numbers as games, impartial and partizan games, winning strategies, outcome classes and algebra of games.

MAT 365Introduction to Topology (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course introduces topology and its applications. Topics covered include topological spaces, quotient and product spaces, metric and normed spaces, connectedness, compactness, and separation axioms. Further topics may include basic algebraic topology, fixed point theorems, theory of knots, and applications to kinematics, game theory, and computer graphics.

MAT 366Combinatorics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 258

This course covers the fundamental techniques and algorithms of counting. Topics include combinations, permutations, lists and strings, distributions, Stirling numbers, partitions, rearrangements and derangements, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, generating functions, and recursion. The course may include further topics such as the Polya-Redfield method, partially ordered sets, enumeration problems from graph theory, Ramsey’s Theorem, block designs, codes, difference sets, finite geometries, Latin squares and Hadamard matrices.

MAT 399Special Topics in Mathematics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor

The content of this course may change each time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to the faculty and students that is not covered by the courses in the current catalog.

MAT 400Introductory Analysis I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250

This course introduces the foundations of real analysis by means of a rigorous reexamination of the topics covered in elementary calculus. The course starts with the topology of the real line and proceeds to a formal examination of limits, continuity, and differentiability. The course also covers the convergence of sequences and series of real numbers and the uniform convergence of sequences of real valued functions.

MAT 410Introductory Analysis II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 400

A continuation of MAT 400, this course emphasizes the formal treatment of the theory of integration of functions of a real variable. It reexamines the Riemann integral and the Fundamental theorem of calculus as well as the theory of the Stieltjes and Lebesgue integral and their applications in probability and Fourier analysis. The course concludes with a discussion of the topology of R^n, and the differentiability and integrability of functions of several variables, including the theorems of Green and Stokes and the divergence theorem.

MAT 450Abstract Algebra I (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258

This course provides an introduction to the foundations of abstract algebra. The fundamental objects of study are groups, rings, and fields. The student builds on previous courses in algebra, particularly linear algebra, with an even greater emphasis here on proofs. The study of groups is an ideal starting point, with few axioms but a rich landscape of examples and theorems, including matrix groups, homomorphism theorems, group actions, symmetry, and quotient groups. This course extends these ideas to the study of rings and fields. Topics in ring theory include polynomial rings and ideals in rings. The course also covers fields, their construction from rings, finite fields, basic theory of equations, and Galois theory.

MAT 460Abstract Algebra II (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 400

This course builds on the foundations established in MAT 450. It extends the fundamental objects of groups, rings, and fields to include modules over rings and algebras. The course gives the basic ideas of linear algebra a more rigorous treatment and extends scalars to elements in a commutative ring. In this context, students study the general theory of vector spaces and similarity of transformations. The curriculum also discusses non-commutative algebras and rings, emphasizing examples, such as quaternion algebras. Further topics may include non-associative rings and algebras, Galois theory, exact sequences, and homology.

Department of Music

MUS 115Fundamentals of Music and Sound Design (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

This course was previously called FLM 275. Credit may be received for MUS 115 or for FLM 275, but not for both.

This course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of music and sound design, and an overview of the production of music and sound for animation, film, and video games. Topics include music notation, key, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, tempo, genre and form; historical musical styles; dialog and timing; and digital audio production methods and techniques.

Department of Physics

PHY 115Introduction to Applied Math and Physics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): None

We live in a world governed by physical laws. As a result we have become accustomed to objects’ motions being in accordance with these laws. This course examines the basic physics and mathematics governing natural phenomena, such as light, weight, inertia, friction, momentum, and thrust as a practical introduction to applied math and physics. Students explore geometry, trigonometry for cyclical motions, and physical equations of motion for bodies moving under the influence of forces. With these tools, students develop a broader understanding of the impact of mathematics and physics on their daily lives.

PHY 200Motion Dynamics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 150

This calculus-based course presents the fundamental principles of mechanics, including kinematics, Newtonian dynamics, work and energy, momentum, and rotational motion.

PHY 250Waves, Optics, and Thermodynamics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200, PHY 200

This calculus-based course presents the fundamentals of fluid dynamics, oscillations, waves, geometric optics, and thermodynamics.

PHY 270Electricity and Magnetism (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): PHY 250

This calculus-based course presents the basic concepts of electromagnetism, including electric fields, magnetic fields, electromagnetic forces, DC and AC circuits, and Maxwell's equations.

PHY 290Modern Physics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, PHY 250 or PHY 270, PHY 200

The wake of modern physics has given rise to massive technological advancements that have changed our daily lives. This course covers many of the modern issues within the field and emphasizes the problem-solving nature of physics. The course is a calculus based scientific examination of topics from general relativity and quantum mechanics through nuclear physics, high-energy physics, and astrophysics.

PHY 300Advanced Mechanics (3 cr.)

Prerequisite(s): MAT 200 or MAT 230, CS 250, MAT 250, PHY 250

This course covers the physics behind more complex mechanical interactions as well as the numerical techniques required to approximate the systems for simulations. A thorough analysis of mechanical systems through energy analysis provides the basis for the understanding of linear and rotational systems. The combination of theoretical physics and numerical methods provide students with the background for simulating physical systems with limited computational power. Topics covered include Lagrangian Dynamics, Hamilton’s Equations, dynamics of rigid bodies, motion in non-inertial reference frames, the use of the inertia tensor, collision resolution, and numerical techniques including methods of approximation.